Welcome to Kenrick A. Claflin & Son

Featured on our web site and in our monthly web catalogues are new and out-of-print books, documents, post cards, photographs, maps and charts, engravings, lithographs, uniforms and insignia, tools, lamps, lens apparatus, equipment and apparatus and much more relating to these heroic services.

  

We now issue most of our catalogues on line rather than by mail. This allows us to issue more catalogues and feature more items, with better photos and descriptions. Let us know your email address and we will email you monthly as our catalogues are posted. 

See This Month's Catalogue Page now. 

 

 See also our U.S. Life Saving Service page. 

 See also our U.S. Light House Service page. 

 See also our U.S. Coast Guard page. 

 See also our Photos - U.S. Coast Guard page. 

 

Monthly Specials !

Free shipping in U.S. on all orders from our New Books-Recent Releases pages over $75.

 

Edward Rowe Snow page - Take up to 50% off on selected “L-“ items plus free shipping as marked.

Also special collection page, fresh from the Estate of Edward Rowe Snow. 

 (Deduction off regular prices. No other discounts may be applied. Please mention this offer.) 

 

Don't Forget Our Closeout Page - Up To 50% off regular pricing.

 

Fresh items added Daily... Look at our Recent Items Page for the Latest Additions. 

 

Monthly Special Sales! 


10% - 50% off on select items or pages.



Select Subject Pages Below:


This Month's Catalogue Page.   

Items Just Received




Pendleton Fort Mercer 1952 Chatham





Lighthouse Blog

Climate Change


 

 

Photos - U.S. Coast Guard 

We are continually acquiring wonderful and rare  original photographs of the U.S. Coast Guard. Below are photos and information. Inquiries welcomed.

See also our new U.S. Life Saving Service page.

 

1433. (copy photo) U.S. Coast Guard Station City Point, Dorchester Bay, Boston Harbor, Mass. c.1930’s view. 8” x 10”. Superb, crystal clear image shows the station, men, lifeboats and more. The City Point Life Saving / Coast Guard Station was one of only two such floating stations in the United States . Anchored in Dorchester Bay , she was designed to render assistance in the numerous casualties occurring to yachts and sailboats in that area. She was equipped with a gasoline launch, the Relief, probably the first station in the country to have a power boat. She was constructed in Greenport, Long Island in 1895 and this rare image shows her at anchor, and with her crew and flags flying, probably for a holiday. Clear, close image. (VG+). $29.95 each.

1440. (photo) U.S. Coast Guard 75-foot Patrol Boat, Baltimore Harbor c.1941. Clear, close, original 8” x 10” press photos shows excellent detail of the wheelhouse of a 75ft. “six-bitter” type patrol boat in Baltimore Harbor. These boats were built in the mid-1920s, of which there were still a number in operation by WWII. Good detail includes binnacle, early deck gun and more. Photo is b/w and includes date and description on back. Dated March 3, 1941. Clear, close view, great detail. (VG+). $38.

13418. (photo) Coast Guardsman On Duty in North Pacific c.1945. Clear, close, original 8” x 10” press photo shows excellent detail of Coast Guardsman Arthur Chester of Baltimore, Maryland as he shoulders his sea bag aboard a Coast Guard-manned vessel in the North Pacific. Nice original view of his uniform, coat and sea bag. Photo is b/w and includes date and description on back. Dated February 25, 1945. Clear, close view, great detail. (VG+). $44.

13419. (photo) Coast Guard Prototype Gas-Turbine Surfboat c.1963. Clear, close, original 8” x 10” press photo shows excellent detail of Coast Guardsman posing aboard a new gas-turbine powered surfboat at the Coast Guard Yard at Baltimre. The 26-foot fiberglass rescue boat was to be displayed for the first time in Washington that year. Photo is b/w and includes date and description on back. Dated February 13, 1963. Clear, close view, great detail. A few crop marks. (VG+). $34.

1464. (lot 2 photos) U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Rockaway Rescues Crew SS Smith Voyager c.1964. Clear, close, original 8” x 10” official Coast Guard photo shows excellent detail of the rescue of the crew of the SS Smith Voyager as a crew from the Coast Guard Cutter Rockaway use a 26-foot Monomoy Surfboat to ferry survivors back to the cutter. The freighter began to take on water in heavy seas 780 miles ESE of Bermuda. 34 survivors were rescued. Photo is b/w and includes date and lengthy description on back. Taken on December 21, 1964. Clear, close view, great detail. (VG+). $66.

 

13262. (photo) Pair Lyle Bronze “C” Line Guns, Coast Guard Station Curtis Bay, Maryland c.1937. 8” x 11”. Clear b/w press photographs shows a pair Lyle Bronze “C” Line Guns flanking the building entrance Coast Guard Station Curtis Bay, Maryland. Nice view, interesting, one wonders where these pieces are now… Clear, original print, some cropping marks. Includes date and description on back. Dated July 19, 1937. (VG). $38.

13286. (photo) Inland Coast Guard Breeches Buoy Rescue, Lowell, Mass. c.1938. 7” x 9”. Clear b/w press photographs shows a rare view of an inland breeches buoy rescue from the Merrimack River in Lowell, Mass. For nearly nine hours local fire and police rescue units attempted to get a line to Edward Giblin, stranded on a jagged rock in the middle of the Merrimack River after having been swept over the Pawtucket Falls while taking a shortcut home over the ice. After nine house with no success, the Newburyport  Coast Guardsmen were rushed to the scene with their breeches buoy apparatus. Coast Guardsmen were able to reach the rock and bring Mr. Giblin ashore in the breeches buoy. His condition was poor and little hope was held out for his recovery. Clear, original print, includes date and description on back. Dated February 3, 1938. (VG+). $48.

  (completed boat, not included)

13266. (photo) Construction of 30-36 foot Picket Boats, Curtis Bay Coast Guard Station, Maryland c.1924. 8” x 10”. Clear b/w press photographs shows a rare view of workers at the Curtis Bay Coast Guard Yard constructing plank-on-frame 30-36 foot picket boats. For over a century, the United States Coast Guard Yard has built, repaired and renovated ships in Baltimore, Maryland for the U. S. Coast Guard. It is the Service's sole shipbuilding and a major repair facility. Wonderful detail showing three boats in various stages of completion. Clear, original print, includes date and description on back. Dated September 25, 1924. (VG+). $58.

13281. (lot 20 photos) U.S. Coast Guard Buoy Tender Clover WAGL-292 c.1950’s. Rare lot from a crewman on the CGC Clover in the Gulf of Alaska in the mid 1950’s. Photos measure about 3 ½” x 5” and include views working buoys , views on the ship, shooting seal, salvaging from sunken vessel, and more. Many photos have descriptions on back and include dates of 1953-1954. The Clover was a Cactus Class Buoy Tender built in 1941. She was built as a WAGL, re-designated a WLB in 1965, and again re-designated a WMEC in 1979. She served mostly in Alaskan waters and on the West Coast. Good lot 20 photos. (VG) $74. 

 

12377. (photo) U.S. Coast Guard Station c.1930-40’s view. Reprint photo on postcard paper shows good detail of the Duluth-Type station. Unknown location but note the windows above the boat-room doors. Photo measures 3 ½” x 5” on postcard paper. Clean, clear. (VG+). $4.

13367. (photo) U.S. Coast Guard Small Boat Auction, Curtis Bay Yard c.1933. Clear, close original 8” x 10” press photo shows great detail of a number of different Coast Guard small boats as they are auctioned off by the Government at U.S. Coast Guard Depot, Curtis Bay, Maryland. Included in the view are three carvel hull version Monomoy pulling surfboats (one of them numbered 3316), plus one Beebe-McLellan or Type H pulling surfboat that is lettered for Station Hereford Inlet (Probably it was their Beebe-McLellan type No. 494, which would have been by 1933 ready for decommissioning). Also to the left is a station dory. Includes surfboats, peapods and more. Photo is b/w and includes credit line and description on back. Dated August 21, 1933. Clear and close view, some crop marks. (VG). $46.

(Thanks to small boat historian Commander Timothy R. Dring, USNR (Retired) for his help in identifying the boats in the above photo.)

13364. (photo) W.W. Reynolds Radio Expert U.S. Coast Guard Setting up Browning Drake Receiver for Isolated Station c.1926. Clear, close original 8” x 10” press photo shows great detail of Mr Reynolds, radio expert for the Coast Guard, as he sets up a Browning Drake receiving radio set that will be one of 200 for use at isolated Coast Guard stations around the country. Photo is b/w and includes credit line and description on back. Dated February 25, 1926. Clear and close view. (VG+). $36.

 

11484. (photo) U.S. Coast Guard  52' MLB Invincible, CG-52300 c.1935. The first of its class of 52-foot motor lifeboats, boat No. 4000, later named Invincible, was completed in Fiscal Year 1936. The 52-foot motor lifeboat originally designated as "Type F" class was a developmental design. There were only two built, the Invincible and her sister, the Triumph, CG-52301. These craft were given an improved cruising radius over the standard 36-foot class of motor lifeboats, a more powerful engine, and accommodations for crew and for rescued survivors. The 52-footer was not self-bailing or self-righting, but her initial stability was very high. The superstructure, including the wheelhouse, engine-room trunk, companionway, and the survivor compartments were constructed of bronze. The hull was divided into six watertight compartments, any two of which could be flooded and the boat would remain afloat. The watertight bulkheads were made of bronze and both were all welded construction. They were designed by the Coast Guard and both were built at the Coast Guard Yard. Sixty persons could be carried below in their watertight compartments and and additional 100 could be carried on deck, weather permitting. They were not intended to replace the standard 36-foot class of motor lifeboats, but rather were designed to meet the need for a larger, more powerful lifeboat for use at locations with extreme sea conditions. During their time in service, they were the only Coast Guard craft under 100-feet in length that received names.  The Invincible was initially stationed at Sandy Hook, New Jersey, but transferred to Grays Harbor Lifeboat Station in 1941. She was transferred to Coos Bay Lifeboat Station sometime later. 7” x 9”. Dated April 19, 1935. Includes description and credit line on back. Rare view. (VG). $46.

13180. (photo) U.S. Coast Guard Testing the New CG-441  72-foot Patrol Boat c.1937. Rare official Coast Guard photo shows Chief Boatswain’s Mate John Williams at the helm of the new CG-441, a new type of patrol boat just put into service in Washington, DC. Powered by four rebuilt Liberty airplane engines totaling more than 1,800 horsepower, paired in tandem to drive twin screws, this boat made 35 MPH in a test on the Patomac River on the day this photo was taken. Boat was intended for patrol and rescue work. Photo provides great detail of the helm including the hand-crank siren for rum-runner persuit. Measures 7” x 9”. Dated May 21, 1937. Included credit line and description on back. Superb rare cockpit view. (VG+). $48.

 

1070. (copy photo) RACE POINT COAST GUARD CREW, Provincetown, Massachusetts c.1940’s. 8 ½” x 11”. Superb, crystal clear image from original photo, shows the Race point Coast Guard crew in winter blues, moving the surfboat on its carriage. Behind can be seen the station drill pole. Amazingly clear, digital print, perfect for framing. Shipped flat. $27.95.

1313. (photo) U.S. Coast Guard SPAR Genevieve Fraleigh c.1943. Great professional photo of C.G. SPAR Genevieve Fraleigh on the stern of a Coast Guard cutter shows great detail of the SPAR uniform in use during the War. Excellent detail, clear and close image. 8” x 10” Dated May 17, 1943. (VG+). $58.

 

 

12403. (photo) U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Chelan CG-45 c.1928. Clear, close b/w photo provides detailed view of this first of five electrically driven, 250-foot “Lake Class” cutters launched in the1920’s. Captain Q.B. Newman, USCG, designed its innovative turbine-electric-drive power plant, which developed an amazing 3,350 shp. These were the first to have alternating current, and a synchronous motor for propulsion. The Chelan was first stationed in Seattle and then transferred to Boston in 1937. She was assigned to International Ice Patrol in 1940, and during World War II lent to the Royal Navy. She was returned in 1946 and sold the following year. Rare view of this important vessel, measures 5 ½” x 6 ½”. Dated December 12, 1928. Includes description on back. (VG). $24.

  

(image not included) 

12241. (photo) SM1c Douglas A. Munro, USCG (1919-1942) Awarded Congressional Medal of Honor. Official Coast Guard photo measures 8” x 10”. (from official Coast Guard biography) “Douglas A. Munro, a signalman first class of the United States Coast Guard, died heroically on Guadalcanal September 27, 1942, after succeeding in his assignment, for which he had volunteered, to evacuate a detachment of Marines from a point where enemy opposition developed beyond anticipated dimensions. Munro's final words were "Did they get off?" As World War II approached, Munro left to enlist in the United States Coast Guard in 1939. He had an outstanding record as an enlisted man and was promoted rapidly through the various ratings to a signalman, first class. In the action [where he was killed in action], Munro had already played an important part, since he was in charge of the original detachment of ten boats that had landed the Marines at the scene. He had successfully got them ashore and then had headed his boats back to a previously assigned position. Almost immediately upon his return, he was advised by the officer in charge that conditions had been different than had been anticipated and that it was necessary to evacuate the men immediately. Munro volunteered for the job of heading the boats for the evacuation. In charge of the rescue expedition, he brought the boats in-shore under heavy enemy fire and proceeded to evacuate the men on the beach. When most of them were in the boats, complications arose in evacuating the last men, whom Munro realized would be in the greatest danger. He accordingly so placed himself and his boats that they would serve as cover for the last men to leave. It was thus that he was fatally wounded -- protecting the men after he had evacuated them. He remained conscious sufficiently long only to say four words: "Did they get off?" He died, therefore, with the realization that his mission had succeeded and his final assignment had been carried out.” In addition to the Medal of Honor, Munro was also awarded, posthumously, the Purple Heart Medal, and was eligible for the American Defense Service Medal, the Asiatic-Pacific Area Campaign Medal, and the World War II Victory Medal. To this date, Munro is the only Coast Guardsman to have been awarded the Medal of Honor. Photo is b/w and includes credit line and description on back. Clear and close official Coast Guard view. Some emulsion loss in one 1” area. A significant individual in Coast Guard history who should not be forgotten. (VG). $74.

 

12200. [glass projection slide] U.S. Coast Guards in Surfboat, Scituate, Mass. c.1920 by De Vry Circulations, Chicago , Ill. Beautiful full color glass projection slide featuring the early Coast Guard crew drilling in their surfboat, with the station drill pole in the background. Close look reveals “Station No. 28” on stern, which was Fourth Cliff Station, Scituate (Humarock). Slide measures 3 ¼” x 4” and presents a superb, clear image. Original hand coloring, beautifully done, quite detailed. (F-). $48.

1296. (photo) Coast Guard 36-Foot T-series MLB Relieving Keepers at Chicago Harbor Lighthouse c.1949. 11” x 14”. Large b/w photo shows good detail looking down from the light tower as Coast Guardsman BM Glen Mc George breaks ice and maneuvers Type TRS Motor Lifeboat CG-36457 out of station Old Chicago to the tower to relieve the keepers on duty. Note the boat’s radio call sign “NSEO” on the deck. The existing light was built at the mouth of the Chicago River in 1893, which was the site of the previous lights. It was moved to its present location on the north breakwater in 1919. The station consists of a 48-foot high, brick-lined round steel tower that is 18-feet in diameter. The lantern is 10-sided built of cast iron, and houses a Third Order Fresnel Lens. Keepers were relieved every three days during this period. Keepers manned the station until 1979 when the light was automated. Great view of this sturdy MLB. Photo is b/w and includes date of February 1, 1939 and credit line or description on back. (VG). $48.

12203. (photo) Coast Guard Cutter Blackthorn (WLB-391) c.1990. Clear, close original 5” x 7” press photo shows great detail of the Blackthorn as she is scuttled in the Gulf of Mexico following a deadly collision. The USCGC Blackthorn was a 180-foot sea-going buoy tender which sank in 1980 in a tragic collision in Tampa Bay. Shortly after the collision, Blackthorn capsized, killing 23 of her crew. The cutter was raised for the investigation, but ultimately was scuttled in the Gulf of Mexico after the investigation was complete. It currently serves as an artificial reef for recreational diving and fishing. It is worthy to note that in 2000, Seaman William “Billy” Flores of Fort Worth, Texas, was posthumously awarded the Coast Guard Medal, the service's highest award for heroism in peacetime. SN Flores, who had been out of boot camp just one year, opened the life jacket locker as the Blackthorn capsized, securing its hatch open with his belt, and made sure that his shipmates were able to access and use the life jackets. His actions saved a number of lives during the accident. His heroic role was initially overlooked by the two official reports, but he was later given the recognition he deserved. His family was presented with the Medal on January 28, 2000, the 20th anniversary of the tragedy. In October 2010, it was announced that the third new “Sentinel” class fast response cutter, a 154 foot patrol boat, would be named for Seaman Flores. Photo is b/w and includes date and description on back. Dated March 1, 1929. Clear, close view, light edge and corner wear. Rare view. (VG). $34.

12184. (photo) U.S. Coast Guard Seaplane Schreck/Viking 00-1 c.1937. Large b/w original photo measures 7 ½” x 9 ½”. Shown is the Schreck/Viking 00-1 seaplane in use during a tragic rescue off Clearwater, Florida in 1937. This was one of six such flying-boats of this type ordered by the Coast Guard. Although somewhat experimental, they were an excellent craft for landing in the open sea. They were placed in operation five stations in the southeast. They were manufactured by the Viking Boat Company and used one Wright Whirlwind R-760 engine. Great detail, clean, clear. (VG+). $38.

12195. (photo) Coast Guard Cutters Manning & Apache c.1929. Clear, close original 8” x 10” press photo shows great detail of the two cutters moored at the Washington Navy Yard for the Presidential inauguration. The Manning (left), was a brigantine-rigged 205-foot, 1,150-ton steamer. She was commissioned in 1898 and saw immediate service during the Spanish American War as a blockader and escort vessel. Apache (right), originally launched as Galveston but renamed in 1904, was a 190-foot, 416-ton, iron-hulled, twin screw steamer. She entered service in 1891 and was decommissioned in 1937. The photo depicts her after extensive modifications carried out in 1904. Photo is b/w and includes date and description on back. Dated March 1, 1929. Clear, close view, light edge and corner wear. Rare view. (VG). $44.

 

  

1202. (photo) U.S. Coast Guard Academy Cadet c.1915-1918. Clear, close, cap tally lettered “Coast Guard Academy”. Photo measures 3 ½” x 5” on postcard paper. Clean, clear. Early Coast Guard image. (VG). $22. 

1203. (photo) U.S. Coast Guard Academy Graduation c.1924. Clear, close, labeled “Rear Admiral Frederick C. Billard USCG, Commander Hinckley, Capt USCGC Alexander Hamilton, Presentation of gift to best skilled cadet May 15, 1924”. Photo measures 3 ½” x 5” on postcard paper. Clean, clear. Early Coast Guard image. (VG). $18.

  

11220. (4 negatives) U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WILLOW WAGL-253 c.1939 - 1944. This was the first Coast Guard Cutter to bear the name WILLOW. She was home ported in Memphis, Tennessee and began her career in the U.S. Lighthouse Service in 1927. The Willow was designed specifically for service on the Mississippi River as a replacement for the tender Oleander. She was 200 feet long and displaced 1070 tons. Powered by a 300 horsepower steam engine, she had a max sustainable speed of 5.0 knots for 1000 miles. Her side-wheels were 23.5 feet in diameter, nine feet wide, and had three-foot buckets. Each wheel was driven by a non-condensing, single engine, 27 inches in diameter by seven-foot stroke. She was the last side-wheel tender in the Lighthouse Service. She became a commissioned Coast Guard cutter upon the merger of the Lighthouse Service with the Coast Guard in 1939 and received the designation and hull number WAGL-253. During World War II she continued tending aids to navigation from New Orleans to Memphis. On Dec 15, 1944, she was decommissioned and transferred to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Set of four 35mm negatives provide unprecedented views of life on board this rare type cutter including the vessel, men relaxing with their reading, and more. Clear, close, a rare set, will make great prints. (VG+). $64.

 

 

2294b. (photo) USCGC Hickory WLI-219. Close clear view of the Hickory while underway. Nice view, b/w,  8” x 10”, clear and close. Official Coast Guard photograph. (F-). $18.

 

11429. (photo) U. S. Coast Guard 44-foot Motor Lifeboat CG-44363, attached to Coast Guard Station Quillayute River, Winter Training Session c.1982. Close clear view of the Coast Guard’s famous 44-foot motor lifeboat plowing through surf on a winter training mission. This 44 foot motor lifboat from Quillayute River and three of its crew: BM2 David Bosley, MK3 Matthew Schlimme, SN Clinton Miniken were to perish, and SA Benjamin Wingo the sole survivor while attempting to render assistance to two persons on the sailing vessel GALE RUNNER, strangers, who were in peril on the sea on February 12, 1997. All four of the crew were awarded the Gold Life-Saving medal (BM2 David Bosley, MK3 Matthew Schlimme, SN Clinton Miniken Posthumously Awarded). Nice view, b/w,  8 ½” x 9 ½”.  $34.

 

  

BR-124. (lot light station photographs) U.S. Coast Guard Official photos c.1950-1980. In 1968 the Coast Guard ordered a compilation of unit histories including light stations. Each station was to send in a short history and photos. The Coast Guard put these together in binders and continued to update them through the 1980’s. All photos are official Coast Guard photos and are of the expected high quality that we are used to in their photos. Most include a typed one or two page history of the light station. Prints are silver prints, all 8” x 10” b/w and are clear and crisp, most taken from the air at close range. There are 57 photos total and include the following: 

(Maine) Saddleback Ledge Lt., Bear Island Lt., Egg Rock Lt., Mt. Desert Island Lt., Burnt Coat Harbor Lt.;

(Massachusetts) Boston Light Station (2), Buzzards Bay Lt., Minot’s Ledge Lt., Cape Ann – Thacher’s Island Lt (2);

(Rhode Island) Point Judith Light Station (2), Warwick Lt;

(Maryland) Smith Point Light Station, Thomas Point Lt;

(Virginia) Cape Henry Lights

(California) Point Conception Light Station, Point Vincente Lt., Point Hueneme Lt., Ancapa Island Lt., Point Loma Lt., Los Angeles Lt., Crescent City Lt., Piedras Blancos Lt., Point Pinos Lt., Cape Mendicino Lt;

(Washington) Marrowstone Point Light Station, Turn Point Lt., Smith Island Lt., Cape Flattery Lt., New Dungeness Lt., Alki Point Lt., Destruction Island Lt., North Head Lt., Cape Disappointment Lt., Grays Harbor Lt., Mukilteo Lt., Patos Island Lt., Burrows Island Lt., Point Robinson Lt., Slip Point Lt., Point Wilson Lt., Point No Point Lt., Westport Lt., West Point Lt., Lime Kiln Lt;

(Oregon) Umpqua River Light Station, Yaquina Head Lt., Cape Blanco Lt., Cape Arago Lt., Heceta Head Lt;

(Alaska) Five Finger Light Station;

(Hawaii) Nwwiliwili Light Station, Molokai Lt., Diamond Head Lt;

Priced $15 each.

 

11407. (photo) U. S. Coast Guard 52-foot Motor Lifeboat Underway Through the Breakers c.1958.Close clear view of the Coast Guard’s 52-foot motor lifeboat underway as she plows through the breakers heading out to sea. Nice view, b/w,  8” x 10”. Dated December 12, 1958. Official Coast Guard photograph with credit line on back. $32.

  

11403. (photo) U. S. Coast Guard 52-foot Motor Lifeboat Underway Through the Breakers c.1958. Close clear view of the Coast Guard’s 52-foot motor lifeboat from Yaquina Bay, Oregon, underway as she plows through the breakers heading out to sea on routine patrol. Nice view, b/w,  8” x 10”. Dated December 12, 1958. Official Coast Guard photograph with credit line on back. Includes crew roster. $32.

11284. (photo) U. S. Coast Guard Cutter Modoc WPG-46 c.1944. The Modoc was a 240-foot Tampa class Coast Guard cutter designed for multi-mission roles. She had a top speed of sixteen knots, and was armed with a pair of 5-inch deck guns. With the breakout of war it was armed with depth charges, additional guns, sonar, and radar and transferred to the Navy. The ship is most remembered for its role in the sinking of the Bismarck. She was decommissioned in 1947. Nice view, b/w,  8” x 10”. $10.

11287. (photo) U. S. Coast Guard Cutter Vigilant WMEC-617. USCGC Vigilant is a Coast Guard medium Endurance cutter. She is the twelfth cutter to bear the name Vigilant, dating back to 1790 when the original Vigilant was built for the Revenue Cutter Service. She was commissioned on October 3, 1964 and remains in service. Nice view, b/w,  8” x 10”. $10.

11291. (photo) U. S. Coast Guard Cutter Pontchartrain WHEC-70. USCGC Pontchartrain (WHEC-70) was an Owasco class high endurance cutter built for World War II service with the Coast Guard. The ship was commissioned just days before the end of the war and thus did not see combat action until the Vietnam War. Official Coast Guard photo. Nice view, b/w,  8” x 10”. $10. 

11295. (photo) U. S. Coast Guard Cutter Glacier WAGB-4. 1968. Glacier was originally commissioned in 1955 in the US Navy but was transferred to the Coast Guard in 1966. She was decommissioned in 1987. She is shown here performing scientific research and seal counts on Filehner’s ice shelf in the Weddell Sea. Official Coast Guard photo. Nice view, b/w,  8” x 10”. $10.

11302. (photo) U.S. Coast Guard Transports Elk Calves c.1962. Official Coast Guard photo shows elk calves being transported from Kodiak to Annette Island, to produce new game animals for southeastern Alaska. Interesting view, with description on back. b/w,  8” x 10”. $6. 

11297. (photo) U.S. Coast Guard Band c.1983. Official Coast Guard photo includes signed letter by Lt. L. J. Buckley, Director, U.S. Coast Guard Band dated January 14, 1983. The band is posing on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. Nice view, b/w,  8” x 10”. $8. 

11296. (lot 4 photos) U. S. Coast Guard Cutter KUKUI  WAK-186 c.1949. The KUKUI was a 339 foot cargo ship homeported in Honolulu from 1946 to 1972. The ship constructed long range navigation (LORAN) stations and provided many of the isolated Pacific Islands with food, medical support and building supplies. This lot of four official photos was taken during a cruise in February 1949 to the Marshall Islands, where they rebuilt the water tanks at the LORAN station there. Views include building the water tanks, unloading supplies, receiving replacements in Honolulu, and a view of the LORAN station. All are official Coast Guard photos. Nice views, b/w,  8” x 10”.  Lot 4 photos $16. 

11298. (photo) U. S. Coast Guard Cutter Owasco WPG-39. Owasco was built for the Coast Guard by the Western Pipe and Steel Company in San Pedro, California. She was launched on 18 June 1944 and was commissioned on 18 May 1945. She was the first of the 255-foot cutters to enter service. After her initial assignment she returned to her regular duties, including law enforcement, ocean station, and search and rescue operations. While in the Viet Nam theatre in November 1968, Owasco crewmen went to the aid of a Navy Swift boat in an incident in which six Owasco crewmen would be cited for meritorious service as a result of direct action with the enemy. Nice aerial view, b/w,  8” x 10”.  $8. 

11294. (copy photo) U. S. Coast Guard Cutter Sebago WHEC-42. The Sebago was an Owasco class high endurance cutter which served with the US Coast Guard from 1945 to 1972. Nice view, b/w,  8” x 10”. $8. 

11278. (official Coast Guard photo) Christening of U. S. Coast Guard Cutters Alexander Hamilton (WPG-34) and John C. Spencer (WPG-36) c.1937. The second cutter named Alexander Hamilton (Builder's No. CG-69) -a twin-screw, steel-hulled Coast Guard cutter - was laid down on 11 September 1935 at the New York Navy Yard and launched on 6 January 1937. She served in the Second World war and was sunk while on patrol in January 1942 by a German U-boat. The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter John C. Spencer (Builder's No. CG-70) was built at the New York Navy Yard in New York, New York and was launched on 6 January 1937.  She was the second cutter to bear that name.  She was commissioned on 1 March 1937. The Spencer served in three wars until she was decommissioned on 23 January 1974. Nice view, b/w,  8” x 10”. $12.

11283. (photo) U. S. Coast Guard Cutter Unalga WPG-53. c.1944. The Revenue Cutter Unalga was built by the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company under a contract signed June 1911, for $250,000.00. She was launched at Newport news, Virginia, on February 10, 1912. She was 190 feet long with a displacement of 1181 tons. She was assigned to the Bering Sea Fleet. During World War II, the Unalga was stationed at San Juan, Puerto Rico. San Juan, being the headquarters of the 10th Naval District. She was decommissioned in October 1945. Nice view, b/w,  8” x 10”. $10.

11256. (photo.) U.S. Coast Guard Cutter BIRCH WAGL-256. c.1940’s. Official “Our Navy Photos” hand tinted photo provides a rare, clear, close view of the Birch underway. 8” x 10”. Commissioned in 1939, the United States Tender Birch was designed by the Lighthouse Service as a bay and sound tender for service along the coast of Florida and vicinity. She was assigned to St. Petersburg, Florida, her home port for for her entire career. In addition to her primary duty of tending aids to navigation, she participated in a number of SAR cases. Birch was decommissioned on 24 February 1963. One of the few existing views of this tender. $24.

11255. (lot 2 photos.) U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WESTWIND WAGP-281. c.1960. Official Coast Guard lot includes 2 photographs 8” x 10” including a close-up of the Westwind’s “Greenland Cruiser” and family awaiting docking. $16.

11253. (lot 9 photos) U.S. Coast Guard 378-foot High Endurance Cutters (WHEC). Lot of eight color and b/w photos, most 8” x 10” include the: Hamilton (715), Dallas (716), Chase (718), Midgett (726). $10 each or $45 for lot 8 photos. 

11257. (document lot) U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Coos Bay WAVP-376. Lot of 3 Coast Guard / Navy documents (6 pages) outlines the history of the Coos bay during the War years as ACP-24 (seaplane tender) and as WAVP-376 (Ocean Station Vessel). Detailed accounts. $10. (photo image not included) 

  

11220. (4 negatives) U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WILLOW WAGL-253 c.1930’s – 1940’s. This was the first Coast Guard Cutter to bear the name WILLOW. She was home ported in Memphis, Tennessee and began her career in the U.S. Lighthouse Service in 1927. The Willow was designed specifically for service on the Mississippi River as a replacement for the tender Oleander. She was 200 feet long and displaced 1070 tons. Powered by a 300 horsepower steam engine, she had a max sustainable speed of 5.0 knots for 1000 miles. Her side-wheels were 23.5 feet in diameter, nine feet wide, and had three-foot buckets. Each wheel was driven by a non-condensing, single engine, 27 inches in diameter by seven-foot stroke. She was the last side-wheel tender in the Lighthouse Service. She became a commissioned Coast Guard cutter upon the merger of the Lighthouse Service with the Coast Guard in 1939 and received the designation and hull number WAGL-253. During World War II she continued tending aids to navigation from New Orleans to Memphis. On Dec 15, 1944, she was decommissioned and transferred to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Set of four 35mm negatives provide unprecedented views of life on board this rare type cutter including the bridge, men relaxing with their reading, and more. Clear, close, a rare set, will make great prints. . (VG+). $24.

11172. (photo) U. S. Coast Guard 36-foot Motor Lifeboat, East Tawas, Michigan c.1946. Fine close photo of a U. S. Coast Guard 36-foot motor lifeboat from East Tawas station, shows great detail of this stalwart craft. Similar lifeboats around the country have saved hundreds of sailors over its career with the Coast Guard. Measures 3 ½” x 5 ½”. Great early detail, on postcard paper. Dates from 1946. (VG). $24.

11153. (lot 2 photos) Breeches Buoy Drill, Straitsmouth Coast Guard Station, Gloucester, Mass. c.1922. Great set of two photos includes the crew drilling with breeches buoy apparatus. Includes crew setting up crotch poles, and crewman riding breeches buoy. Early views, close, clear measure 3 ½” x 5 ½”. (VG+). Set 2 photos $24.

  

10493. (mounted photo) Coast Guard Trainees at Perth Amboy c.1918. Large mounted photo shows the “Chicago Boys” in training at Perth Amboy, New Jersey and dated May 11, 1918. Location identified on photo by one of the trainees. Photo is b/w and measures 6 ½” x 8 ½” on 10” x 12” mount. Clean, clear, one chip from mount. (VG). $64.

10495. (negative) Removing Snow from 36-foot MLB c.1950-1960. Original large-format (4"x5") acetate negative of crew brushing snow from the 36-foot Motor Lifeboat, possibly at station Chicago. Clear and close, would provide a clear image. (VG+). $34.

11265. (document lot) U.S. Coast Guard Cutter CACTUS WLB-270 c.1968-69. Lot of 3 Coast Guard documents (5 pages). Includes unit history (2) and operational orders (2). Good information. $8. (photo image above not included) 

11266. (lot 10 photos) U.S. Coast Guard 327-foot Treasury Class Cutters (WPG). Lot of ten color and b/w photos, 8” x 10” include the: (3) Bibb (31), (2) Campbell (32), (3) Duane (33), and Ingham (2) (35). $10 each or $65 for lot 10 photos. 

11260. (document lot) U.S. Coast Guard Cutter COOK INLET WAVP-384. Lot of 13 Coast Guard documents (13 pages) and newspaper clippings with one photo. Includes Change of Command release with color photo, accounts of two dramatic rescues by the Cook Inlet, Ship’s history, letter of appreciation from the CO to five members of the crew, two newspaper articles with two photos. Detailed accounts. $16. (photo image above not included) 

11237. (photo) USCGC Shackle WYTL-65609. The Shackle is one of a fleet of 11 small Coast Guard Tugboats. Shackle is 65 feet long, displaces 72 tons, is 19 feet abeam. She has a single 400hp engine which will cruise her at about 10 knots. A crew of 6 is required. The primary activities of these small harbor tugs are domestic ice breaking, port security, search and rescue, and law enforcement operations in rivers and near shore areas. Each vessel in the fleet is named after a piece of deck hardware, such as Cleat, Bollard, Bridle, Tackle, Chock, Pendant, Line, Wire, Hawser, Capstan and Shackle pictured above. Members of Flotilla 24 and Flotilla 21 have trained on the Shackle to augment her crew on missions in Maine’s Casco Bay Area. 8” x 10”. $14.

10429. (photo) Coast Guard 40-foot utility boat c.1958. Clear, close original 8” x 10” press photo shows great detail of Coast Guard CG-40499 40-footer as she heads out of Charlevoix, Michigan  in search for survivors of the sunken freighter Carl C. Bradley. On Tuesday, Nov. 18, 1958, at 5:31 p.m., the limestone carrier, Carl C. Bradley, was up bound on Lake Michigan, having delivered her last limestone cargo of the year to Indiana. She stayed close to the Illinois and Wisconsin shores because of reports of severe weather conditions rapidly developing from the west. As it reached the area of Sturgeon Bay, Wis., suddenly, the Bradley's wheel went slack. On the course it was on, the winds and waves were striking the ship on the aft quarter of the port side causing the ship to rock severely and soon break in half. First Mate, Elmer Fleming, knew the ship was in trouble and initiated a Mayday. Almost every Coast Guard unit on the Great Lakes heard the calls and initiated an immediate response. Two survivors would soon be rescued from a raft in the towering seas. Photo shows great details of the boat as she speeds to the scene. Photo is b/w and include date and credit line or description on back, with some crop marking. Dated November 19, 1958.(VG).  $34.

  

10247.  (negative) Working on cutter, Coast Guard Station Chicago c.1951. Original large-format (4"x5") acetate negative of a scene at the Chicago Coast Guard Station at the river and Lake Front on May 17, 1951. Robert Evans, Henry Fassl and Geroge Pesut are maintaining an early cutter while listening to a baseball game on the radio. Clear and close, would provide a clear image. (VG+). $24.

10253.  (negative) Working on the boats, Coast Guard Station Chicago c.1950-1960. Original large-format (4"x5") acetate negative of a scene at the old Chicago Coast Guard Station at the river and Lake Front. In the background is the station’s 36ft. Type TRS motor lifeboat , possibly the CG36445. The utility boat in the foreground is a 40-footer (note the twin rudder quadrants). Clear and close, would provide a clear image. (VG+). $34.

 

10236. (photo) Coast Guard Works to Rescue Group Marooned on Jetty Lighthouse, Lake Erie. c.1933. Clear, close 8” x 10” Acme News photo shows a close view of the jetty lighthouse as Coast Guardsmen in a 36-foot MLB maneuver to attempt a rescue. The description on the back notes: “Waves balk rescue of men marooned on jetty. Trapped for twenty four hours at the end of a mile long jetty into Lake Erie, ten Clevelanders faced another night of hunger as a seething lake prevented their rescue. Their first night was sspent atop a lighthouse shed but Coast Guards later were able to shoot them a line on which was the key to the lighthouse. Photo shows a group of the men anxiously watching the efforts of a Coast Guard crew attempting to rescue them.” July 3, 1933. With credit line or description on back. Rare rescue scene. (VG+) $58. 

   

10229. (photo) U.S. Coast Guard Tending to Buoy c.1956. Clear, close 8” x 10” newspaper photos  show the U.S. Coast Guard buoy tender standing off as a worker works on lamp atop floating buoy along the Gulf coast. Great detail. October 7, 1956. With credit line or description on back. (VG+) $42. 

10140. (photo) USCGC Ossipee (WPG-50) c.1940.  Official Coast Guard photograph details the Ossipee in the Great Lakes as she patrols during the Mackinac Race in 1940. The USS Ossipee (WPG-50) was a United States Coast Guard Cutter, serving from 1915 until 1945. She was built by the Newport News Shipbuilding Corp as a cruising cutter and commenced coastal patrol and rescue operations in the U.S. Coast Guard in a cruising district from Maine to Cape Ann, Massachusetts. Ossipee continued coastal patrol, rescue, and navigational aid service operations out of Portland, Maine, through 1935, when she was transferred to Great Lakes duty in 1936 and was assigned to Sault St. Marie, Michigan. Ossipee decommissioned on 12 June 1945. Clear close view provides great detail as she steams out of port. Includes caption. Nice early cutter view. 8” x 10”. (VG+). $32.

 

29179b. (negative) U.S. Coast Guard Station, Manomet Point , Mass. c.1940.  Clear close negative captures the 1901 Duluth-Type life-saving station at the end of the roadway. Includes a good view of the beach erosion as it nears the buildings. In 1928, the station surfboat was tossed end over end with the loss of Keeper William Cashman and surfmen Griswols and Stark while attempting to rescue the crew from the “Robert E. Lee”. Large image measures 4” x 5” and is clear and close. Would provide a great clear image. (VG+). $18.

Official U.S. Coast Guard Photographs

(photo) U.S. Coast Guard Light Station, Ship John Shoal. 

29172. Views from this lot ($18-$32 each) include:

Lighthouses: Romer Shoal – ’53, West Bank Light Station –’58, Stepping Stones – ’63, Execution Rocks – ’63, Esopus Meadow – ’63, Miah Maull Shoal – ’63, Penfield Reef – ’58, Ship John Shoal – ’68 (shown), Brandywine Shoal – ’68, New Dorp – ’63, Falkner Island – ’63, Lynde Point – ’63, Cape St. Elias Light, Alaska – ’50, North Brother Island – ’63, Fire Island Inlet Breakwater Light – ’63, Barnegat Inlet North Breakwater Light – ’64, Delaware Bay East Icebreaker Light – ’63.

 

USCG Ships/boats/other: Five Fathom Lightship – ’63, 26 ft motor surfboat (assigned to USCGC Spencer) – ’65, 18 ft motor launch – ’66, LARC-5 (self-propelled amphibious vehicle) – ’65, NY Operation Sail – 1964, Argentine Navy sailing ship LIBERTAD, Portuguese Navy sailing ship SAGRES.

 

USCG Stations/Bases: CGSta Shark River (NJ) – ’59, CGSta Atlantic Beach (LI) – ’63, CGSta Eaton’s Neck (LI) – ’63, CGSta Fire Island (LI) – ’68 photo of planned new station, CGSta Fire Island (LI) – photo of completed new station, CGBase Gloucester (NJ),  Unknown CGStation.

 

LORAN Stations: Matratin – ’63, Estartit – ’63, Estaca De Vares – ’63, Estaca De Vares – Timer room equipment – ’63, Simeri Grighi – ’63, Caglairi – ’63, Targabarun – ’63, CGLMS Rhodes – Technician at console – ’63, MEDSEC OFFICE , Naples.

 

28236. (photo negatives) U.S. Coast Guard Station, North Beach, Assategue Island, Md. c.1940’s. Two large format 2 ¾” x 4 ½” negatives provide clear, close views of the 1882-Type station at North Beach. Will print well, great views. (VG+). $38.

2964. (photo) U.S. Coast Guard Station, Kewaunee, Wisconsin c.1926. Original official U.S. Coast Guard photo shows the expanded Bibb #3 Type station built in 1893 with a Lake Michigan steamer getting up steam nearby. Nice clear, close view shows the crew working on a number of the station boats on the boatramp. Photo measures 3 ½” x 9” and stamped on the back “Government Property…. U.S. Coast Guard….” And is dated June 4, 1926.  Nice view, clean, with tape album corners on the margin. (VG+). $34.

28197. [glass slide] U.S. Coast Guards in Surfboat. #146. c.1920 by De Vry Circulations, Chicago, Ill. Beautiful b/w glass projection slide featuring the early Coast Guard crew drilling in their surfboat, with the station drill pole in the background. Slide measures 3 ¼” x 4” and presents a superb, clear image. (F).  $68.

  

10472. (lot 3 photos) U.S. Coast Guard Crew, CGC Mackinaw c.1981. Clear, close original 8” x 10” press photos show three views men on the bridge of the Coast Guard icebreaker Mackinaw on Lake Erie and the Detroit River. Views include Captain A. H. Litteken Jr directing the vessel, QM-3 Eric Smialek at the chart table, and a lookout on the enclosed wing of the bridge. Photos are b/w and are dated 1981-1986. Includes credit line and descriptions on back. Nice Coast Guard images. (VG+). Lot 3 photos $44.

10455.  (negative) Coast Guard CG-36377 c.1960. Original large-format (4"x5") acetate negative of CG-36377 searching waters around Chicago’s Merrill C. Meigs Airport for remains of a downed aircraft. Dated November 30, 1960, view is clear and would provide a good image of the MLB. Includes original description and envelope. (VG+). $26.

2608. (large panoramic photo) U. S. Coast Guard Cutter Beal CG-9 (1912-1934) c.1926. Large panoramic photo shows the cutter moored at Boston on November 17, 1926. Photo by J. C. Crosby. Naval Photographer, Boston. Sepia photo measures a full 10” by 24” and shows a close view from the port side as a few crew members on board stand watching. USS Beale, a 742-ton Paulding class destroyer built at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was commissioned in late August 1912. She served with the Atlantic Fleet during the next three years, with participation in the 1914 occupation of Vera Cruz providing a break from routine training and exercises. In early 1916 Beale began neutrality patrols along the East Coast and continued operations in that area after the United States entered World War I in April 1917. Beale crossed the Atlantic to the European war zone early in 1918. Based at Queenstown, Ireland, she was assigned to anti-submarine patrol and convoy escort duties for the rest of the conflict. Returning to the U.S. in late 1918, she served in Atlantic Coast waters until decommissioned in October 1919. She was transferred to the U.S. Coast Guard in 1924. As USCGC Beale (CG-9), the destroyer helped enforce prohibition laws until October 1930, when she was returned to the Navy and placed in reserve at the Philadelphia Navy Yard. USS Beale was stricken from the register of U.S. Naval vessels in July 1934 and scrapped later in that year. USS Beale was named in honor of Brigadier General Edward F. Beale, U.S. Volunteers, (1822-1893), who, as a U.S. Navy Midshipman, played an important role in the war with Mexico. Photo is as originally rolled, with a few cracks to the emulsion due to the rolling, but would still be striking matted and framed. Extremely rare to find these large early portrait photos of cutters. (G+). 174.

 

2757. [mounted photograph] Young Coast Guardsman c.1920’s. Original portrait photograph, of young Coast Guardsman in uniform posing with another gentleman. This rare posed portrait photograph shows the handsome young man in his new 7-button short collar tunic and b ell-top hat. Clearly visible on the hat is “U. S. Coast Guard” on the tally. The image measures 4” x 5 ¾”  on a 6 ¾” x 10 ¾” original mat. Mat marked in pencil “Newell”. Rare both for the presence of a family member and the nice crisp early uniform view. Unusually close and clear, one of the better images we have had in some time. A little edge wear, a perfect piece for framing. (VG+). $54.

28220. (negatives / photographs) Coast Guard Keeper Ralph Banks and Family, Marshall Point Lighthouse, Maine. December 20, 1957. To help mariners entering Port Clyde's harbor or passing to the west into Muscongus Bay, Congress appropriated $4000 for a light station at Marshall Point in March 1831, replaced in 1857 with the present 31-foot brick and granite light tower. Coast Guardsman Ralph Banks was assigned with his family to this station as keeper from 1952 to 1963. These close clear photographs were taken in 1957, showing Banks and his family at the station. Lot consists of five large format 4” x 5” negatives with five contact prints, showing Banks and his family at the station. Views include the family posing around the Christmas tree, on the lighthouse walkway, in front of the light station sign, the station flag tower, and in the station jeep. Rare images of Coast Guard keeper and family. (F-). $145.

     

27251. (photo) U. S. Coast Guard 36-foot Motor Lifeboat c.1950’s. Very nice close view of  a 36-foot motor lifeboat and crew “looking for pirates”, so it says in the margin. Clean and clear image, good detail. 3 ¼” x 4 ½”. (VG+). $16.

2706. (portrait photo) Seaman, U. S. Coast Guard c.1942. Nice mounted view of young Coast Guardsman. 5” x 7” image in 7 ½” x 11” mount. One spot on lower edge of image, some staining on mount. (VG-). $8.

27227. (photo) U. S. Coast Guard Cutter “Vinces” c.1930 - 1940. Photo taken by Murry & Tregurtha ship builders in Boston after re-powering. Clean, 3-hole punched on margin. (VG). $24.

27309. (photo) Lifeboat Station Crew, Oswego Lifeboat Station, New York c.1953. Posed official photograph shows the officers and men of the Oswego Lifeboat Station taken in December 1953. 8” x 10”, b/w. All officers and men are identified on an attached sheet. Light wear and ageing to edges. Clear, close view. (VG).  $36.

 

26116. (photo) U. S. Coast Guardsman returning from the hunt c.1930. 3 ½” x 5 ½”. Clear, close view as he poses with his day’s catch. (VG). $48.

  

1091b. (photo) Coast Guard Weather Patrol – Preparing Balloons for Flight c.1945. Official Coast Guard photograph details the Chief Aerographer as he leans over the ship’s rail to adjust the giant weather balloons that will pilot the radio sonde transmitter to the correct heights for recording temperature and humidity. Includes official Coast Guard caption and credit line on the back. Clear close view. 8” x 10”. (VG+). $14.

   

26268. (photo) Hunniwells Beach Coast Guard station, Popham beach, Maine c.1920. Excellent clear, close view shows great detail of the expanded 1882-Type station at Hunniwells Beach. Image included the original expanded station, later additions and additional boathouse. The image measures 3 ½”  x 5 ½” and is printed on postcard paper. Photo is clear, and crisp, excellent contrast. Rare to see such station photos. (VG+).  $44.

 

26180. (photo) Raising the ensign U. S. Coast Guard Tug Yonaguska WYT-195. U. S. Coast Guard b/w photograph shows a sailor raising the commissioning pennant and ensign on the flag mast. Clear, close 8” x 10” view. (VG+). $38.

26185. (photo) Raising the American Flag U. S. Coast Guard Tug Yonaguska WYT-195. U. S. Coast Guard b/w photograph shows a sailor raising the American Flag on the stern flag mast. Clear, close 8” x 10” view. (VG+). $22

 

28148. (photo) Damiscove Island Life-Saving Station, Maine. 2 ¼” x 3 ¼” b/w. (VG+). $22.

28265. (photo) U.S. Coast Guard Warrant Officer displaying his catch. c.1925. 2 ¾” x 4 ½”. (G+). $16.

29354. (glass slide) U. S. Coast Guard CG-441. CG-440 and CG 441 were built in 1937 and shipped to Fort Lauderdale to intercept smugglers. Built for speed by Robert Cruse, they each cost $25,000 and were powered by four rebuilt aircraft engines, capable of pushing the craft two 37 mph. Clear close view provides great detail of these little known craft. 3 ¼” x 4”. (VG+). $32.

29160. (copy photo) Breeches Buoy Rescue or Transfer. Excellent clear, close view of man being transferred in breeches buoy. 8” x 10” b/w digital print. $14.

26233. (photo) Model U. S. Coast Guard 36-foot Motor Lifeboat. Fine close photo of a U. S. Coast Guard 36-foot motor lifeboat shows freat detail of this attractive model. Pencil notations on obverse note that “model built by a surfman at Buffalo”. 3 ½” x 4 ½”. b/w. (VG+). $10.

28416. (photo negative) U.S. Coast Guard Station, Manitou Island c.1934. Clear image shows the early station with the lookout tower added nearer the water. On the beach can be seen a 36-footer along with a number of other boats. Taken in 1934 by Erhardt Peters. Large format 2 ½” x 4 ½”. (F). $74.

28339. (copy photo) Unloading U.S. Coast Guard Surfboats from Railroad Flatcars c.1927. The flood began when heavy rains pounded the central basin of the Mississippi in the summer of 1926. By September, the Mississippi's tributaries in Kansas and Iowa were swollen to capacity. On New Year's Day of 1927, the Cumberland River at Nashville topped levees at 56.2 feet. The Mississippi River broke out of its levee system in 145 places and flooded 27,000 square miles, with depths up to 30 feet The flood caused over $400 million in damages and killed 246 people in seven states. B/w copy photo measures 8” x 9” and shows the railroad flatcars in a submerged section near the river, used to facilitate unloading of the Coast Guard’s surfboats to be used for rescue. At least five surfboats can be seen in the background. (VG). $20.

28315. (copy photo) Harvey Cedars Coast Guard Station – Fishing Club after the Great Storm of 1962, Long Beach Island, NJ.  By the mid 1930’s, Six or seven large, modern homes fronted the ocean between Sussex Avenue and the Coast Guard station on Gloucester, After World War II, the Coast Guard station was decommissioned and the building was bought by the Long Beach Island Fishing Club. In March 1962 northeaster, a powerful system of two storms which stalled over the Atlantic Ocean, which would gain the reputation as "The Storm of the Century. Over a stretch of about 600 miles, the wind pushed the water ahead of it in long swells that rose 30 feet high in the open ocean. By the time these reached the shore they were traveling at freight train speed and were as high as a three story building. By the third day the high tide floated houses off their foundations, broke roads and dug new inlets across town. Friday morning was clear and sunny, except there were no dunes, little beach and few houses. When it was over what was left of Harvey Cedars looked like a war zone. This photo is of a building destroyed along the beach and I am told that this may have once been part of the Coast Guard station. The Harvey Cedars water tower can be seen in the background. Photo is b/w and measures 8 ½” x 11”. (F). $20.

28116. (photo) U. S. Coast Guard Cutter Galatea WPC-108. Large 8” x 10” b/w photo shows crew chipping ice on the deck on this Thetis Class Patrol Boat. Labeled on back: “January 1945  U. S. S. Galatea U. S. C. G. at U.S. Naval Frontier Base Tompkinsville, Staten Island. Returned from North Atlantic Patrol.” (VG-). $12.

26167. [cabinet photograph] c.1900. Original portrait photograph, of a U. S. Coast Guard Surfman. This rare posed portrait photograph shows the young surfman proudly posing in his 4-button single-breasted uniform coat. Clearly visible on his collars are the life ring with crossed oars bronze insignia, and his uniform cap with “U. S. Coast Guard” clearly visible on the band. The image measures 4” x 6” and is in original folder. Photo is clear, and crisp, one of the better images we have had in some time. It is exceptionally rare to see such photos of surfmen in any format. (VG+). $145 net.  

23296. World War II Coast Guard serviceman’s commemorative photograph. Beautiful large 11" x 14" framed photographic print commemorates Coast Guardsman’s service in the Armed Forces. Beautiful framed background commemorative mat pictures battle scenes surrounding a 4" x 6" b/w portrait photograph of the young Coast Guardsman. This lovely framed photograph probably hung in his mothers parlor throughout the war to remind her of her son in the service. Complete as mounted on hardboard. c.1940. (VG). $48.

Coast Guardsman's Photo Albums, 1938-48!

The second album begins with more of the Portugal views from May of 1941. While there, with the war in Europe ongoing, the crew painted the ship, from peace time white and spar colors to battleship war gray. They were ordered out by Portugal. Next photos are aboard ship, at a "Smoker," many views of boxing matches, a wrestling match. great views of heavy seas, the deck awash. One page has 1942 views on one side, and 1946 views on the other. We can't say whether there ever were combat photos as taking photos was limited during that period, but those war years are absent. Next snap shots are on the Abeline, beginning March, 1946. There are views of the sharks caught by the crew. Next, the views are from the Icebreaker Eastwind, including a cruise to Greenland. Many good shots of the Fury & Hecla Sound, Kane Basin (between Ellesmore Island & Greenland, Dundas Harbor (Ellesmore), Greenland natives, Thule, dogs, ice, walrus skins drying, etc. There are 65 views from this cruise. Additionally, there are a few photos of the Coast Guardsman's family members. His first ship, the Cutter Tahoe, is shown in one view (1928). The owner of this album retired on July 1, 1955, after 26 years, 6 months and 15 days in the service (retirement orders are included). He was from Worcester, Massachusetts.

Leather covers a bit worn from years of viewing, spine missing or mostly missing; some chipping of pages; very few photos missing, one page torn. Otherwise VG. Albums measure 9" X 14" and 10" X 12 1/2". Most photos are snap shot size (3 X 4"), some larger, some smaller. Photos are in VG condition, all excellent clarity. (VG-). 22197c. $365 net.

 

22197b. [Collection of photos and documents, US Coast Cutters Algonquin, Redwing, Tallapoosa, Unulga, Itasca, Shoshone c. 1920’s & 1930’s.]

Wonderful extensive collection highlight the day to day duties of a Coast Guardsman in the 1920’s. It appears from the photographs that the owner once served aboard the CGC Algonquin in the Northwest, later being transferred to the Shoshone and others. Original album contains over 300 original b/w photographs of Coast Guard vessels, station life, gun drills, action and fires at sea, on leave and much more. Photos are in the 3x3 to 3x5 range and are mounted on album pages from the era. Interesting clear, close views are all in vg or better condition, pages a bit brittle from age but nicely intact.

22268. In addition the lot includes a wonderful U.S.C.G.C. Algonquin tinted photograph. The Algonquin was commissioned from 1898- 1930. During the early 1920"s she was assigned to the Bering Sea Patrol out of Seattle Washington and Astoria Oregon. The Algonquin was once a vessel of the U.S. Revenue Cutter Service, transferring to the Coast Guard in 1915. The photograph measures 10" X 7" and is framed in in a vintage frame measuring 11 1/2" X 7 1/2". Early color is good, slight crease not to break surface, and very slight staining, no water damage. Identified in l/l corner "U.S.C.G.C. Algonquin June - 5 – 1920".

Additional items in lot include: Cash Pay Receipts; newspaper article describing the succesful war patrom of the submarine USS Wahoo; Specimine Examination Manual for Merchant Marine Deck Officer, USCG. 1943; US Coast Guard, Certificate of Discharge to Merchant Seaman, 1951.

This collection was purchased from an estate in Astoria Oregon and is as found and provides a wonderful glimpse into early Coast Guard life. Complete lot of 310 items: $431 net.

5128. U.S. Coast Guard boat crews landing on a beach in Alaska. Labeled on back: "USS Mojave, U.S.C.G." 3 1/2"x5", on post card paper, clear, slight soil. (G) $18.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Page updated November 05, 2014

Procedure to order items:

1. I suggest that you call us or email to check on availability of any item that you would like other than recent books. As items go quite quickly, please call and leave a message to reserve items that you would like. I will return your call, hold the items and await your letter or credit card information. We will also weigh the items and advise postage. 

2. You may then call or email credit card information, or forward a check in the mail.

Most items are mailed US Priority Mail or UPS. Additional information on our "Ordering Page".

Massachusetts residents must add 6.25% sales tax.

 

    Can't find what you are looking for?
    We can help you find that needed book or item.
    mailto:jclaflin@LighthouseAntiques.net

    How to reach us:
    Kenrick A. Claflin & Son Nautical Antiques
    1227 Pleasant Street, Worcester, MA 01602 

    Phone (508) 792-6627

    All text and illustrations on web site Ó James W. Claflin . 11/05/2014 All rights reserved. Use prohibited without written permission.

    Hit Counter