Kenrick A. Claflin & Son Nautical Antiques

 

Welcome to Kenrick A. Claflin & Son Nautical Antiques Online Catalogue

We specializes in the field of United States Lighthouse Service (USLHS), Light House Establishment (USLHE), Life-Saving Service (USLSS), Revenue Cutter Service (USRCS), Shipwrecks and early Coast Guard (USCG), and works by Edward Rowe Snow. More particularly, we work to provide various governmental agencies, historical groups, restoration contractors and collectors with information and original artifacts relating to lighthouses, life-saving stations, keepers, etc. in their area. Our stock includes books, post cards, both new and out-of-print, photos, engravings, newspapers, charts, lithographs, paintings, uniforms, flags, insignia, antiques, Fresnel lenses, lamps, lanterns, brassware and more.

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Lightships - Light Vessels

For additional items please see our Rare Out of Print page as well. 

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20363J. Flint , Willard. LIGHTSHIPS OF THE U. S. GOVERNMENT – Reference Notes. GPO. 1989. 540p. Blue cloth government binding. The most complete work ever published on U. S. lightships and lightship stations. Lists virtually every detail available on each vessel, when and where built, cost, sister ships, design, length, propulsion, when and where it served, construction notes and modifications through the years, station assignments, masters and mates, illuminating apparatus, fog signals, final disposition and much more. Listed by vessel and by station assignment. Most difficult to find and the ultimate reference on the subject. (VG+). $175. 

12429b. (photo) Umatilla Reef Lightship No. 93 c.1939. 5” x  8” b/w press photograph shows the Umatilla Lightship No. 93 in port, being made ready to her station eighteen miles off Tatoosh Island, Washington. Under the reorganization, the lightship was taken over by the Coast Guard at this time. Includes newspaper caption on back with description. Dated June 11. 1939. Clean, close and clear, crop marks in margins. (VG). $48.

1330b. (photo) Huron Lightship No. 103 c.1946. Clear, close original 8” x 10” official Coast Guard photo shows great detail of the Huron lightship moored at the Coast Guard Aids to Navigation School in Detroit as Coast Guardsmen learn by actual contact, this phase of lighting the stormy Great Lakes. Photo is b/w and includes date and description on back. Dated November 20, 1946. Clear, close view, great detail. (VG). $44.

13129. (photo) Lightships Boston, Portland, Cross Rip, Relief c.1955. Clear, close, large original 9 ½” x 12 ½” press photo shows great detail of four lightships awaiting disposal after being decommissioned and sold by the government. Vessels include Boston Lightship No. 81, Portland Lightship No. 90, Cross Rip Lightship No. 96, and probably Relief Lightship No. 98. Photo is b/w and includes date and description on back. Dated September 8, 1955. Clear, close view, great detail, unusually large photo.  (VG+). $74.

11457b. (photo) U. S. Coast Guard Lightship Swiftsure WAL-535 (LV-113). c.1946.Close clear view of the Swiftsure Lightship on station off the coast of Washington. Nice view, b/w,  8” x 10”, clear and close, shows wonderful detail as she is re-supplied by long-boat by the tender. Official Coast Guard photograph with credit line on back. Dated November 20, 1946. Superb detail. (F-). $56.

12255c. (photo) Nantucket Lightship LV-112 c.1936. 7” x 9”. Wonderful clear, close view of the lightship shortly after launching in 1936. Lightships played a crucial role and none more than those on the dreaded Nantucket Shoals. This area of the coastline boasted more light vessels over the years than any other coastline in the world. The ‘112 was built in 1936 following a collision with her predecessor LV-117 in 1934 by the British liner SS Olympic. This photo shows her as launched, with a tall stack for her steam boiler, steel pilot house and two masts with 500mm lanterns and lantern galleries. Unusually close view, includes credit line and date on back. Dated June 19, 1936. (VG+). $38.

 

1370a. (photo) U.S. Lightship WLV-613 Ambrose Under Construction, Curtis Bay, Md. c.1952. Clear, close original full 18” x 22” U.S. Coast Guard photo shows great detail of the Ambrose Lightship on the ways at Coast Guard Yard, Curtis Bay, prior to launching. Includes great details of the hull and superstructure as construction continues. She would be launched on August 4, just two days after this photo was taken. In 1952, the Lightship Ambrose (WLV 613) was commissioned and became the last lightship to mark the Ambrose Channel when she was replaced by a Texas Tower in August 1967. She was reassigned as a relief ship on the Massachusetts coastline from 1967–75, and then renamed Nantucket II when she was reassigned to Nantucket Shoals. Photo is close and clear. Includes date and credit line on back. Dated August 2, 1952. (VG+). $54.

1370b. (photo) U.S. Lightship WLV-613 Ambrose Under Construction, Curtis Bay, Md. c.1952. Clear, close original full 18” x 22” U.S. Coast Guard photo shows great detail of the Ambrose Lightship on the ways at Coast Guard Yard, Curtis Bay, prior to launching. Includes great details of the hull and superstructure as construction continues. She would be launched on August 4, just two days after this photo was taken. In 1952, the Lightship Ambrose (WLV 613) was commissioned and became the last lightship to mark the Ambrose Channel when she was replaced by a Texas Tower in August 1967. She was reassigned as a relief ship on the Massachusetts coastline from 1967–75, and then renamed Nantucket II when she was reassigned to Nantucket Shoals. Photo is close and clear. Includes date and credit line on back. Dated August 2, 1952. (VG+). $54.

1333. (photo) Superstructure, U.S. Lightship Ambrose WLV-613 c.1963. Clear, close original 8” x 10” press photo shows great detail of the Warrant Boatswain C.V. Barrett standing beneath the 15,000 candle power tripod light structure on Ambrose Lightship at  her station guarding New York’s outer harbor. In 1952, the Lightship Ambrose (WLV 613) was commissioned and became the last lightship to mark the Ambrose Channel when she was replaced by a Texas Tower in August 1967. She was reassigned as a relief ship on the Massachusetts coastline from 1967–75, and then renamed Nantucket II when she was reassigned to Nantucket Shoals. Photo is unusually close and clear. Photo is b/w and includes date and description on back. Dated September 20, 1963. Clear, close view, clean, crisp. Rare view. (VG+). $38.

1330. (photo) Huron Lightship No. 103 c.1946. Clear, close original 8” x 10” press photo shows good detail of the Huron lightship moored at the Coast Guard Aids to Navigation School in Detroit as Coast Guardsmen learn by actual contact, this phase of lighting the stormy Great Lakes. Photo is b/w and includes date and description on back. Dated November 30, 1946. Clear, close view, great detail. (VG). $44.

 

12449. (photo) U.S. Lightship No. 9 c.1890. Very nice early albumen photo shows Lightship No 9 moored at the pier, possibly at Woods Hole on Cape Cod. LV-9 was built at the Philadelphia Navy Yard in 1857 and at about the period of this photo, she was serving as Relief in the 2nd L.H. District. Clear, crisp image measures 4 ¾” x 6 ½” and provides good detail of the masts and deck structures, including the 1000 pound fog bell on the foredeck. (VG+). $78.

12468. (photo) Michigan Eleven Foot Shoal Light Vessel No 60 c.1915. Snapshot photo provides rare view of LV-60 on station at Eleven Foot Shoals in Michigan. The crew can be seen standing at the rails in this close view. LV-60 served her entire career at this station -  from 1893 to 1925. Measures 2 ¼” x 3 ¼”. (VG). $22.

1322. (copy photo) Nantucket Lightship LV-112 c.1936 view. 8” x 10”. Wonderful clear, close view of the lightship shortly after launching in 1936. Lightships played a crucial role and none more than those on the dreaded Nantucket Shoals. This area of the coastline boasted more light vessels over the years than any other coastline in the world. The ‘112 was built in 1936 following a collision with her predecessor LV-117 in 1934 by the British liner SS Olympic. This photo shows her as launched, with a tall stack for her steam boiler, steel pilot house and two masts with 500mm lanterns and lantern galleries. Unusually close view, chemical print made from original. (M). $29.95.

 

867c. Packard, Winthrop. REDUCING THE TOLL OF THE SEA – The Submarine Signal. [New England Magazine. September 1912. Pp. 334-342]. A very nice overview of the history and experiments to develop a method to increase safety at sea be developing a method of submarine wireless signaling to ward off vessels in danger. With two nice illustrations of Nantucket Shoals Light-Vessel. Full issue. with many interesting articles and advertisements of the period. Clean, unusually good condition. (VG+). $32.

   

12440. (photo) Crew Cross Rip Lightship No. 96 c.1938. Extremely rare crew photo on the Lighthouse Service Lightship Cross Rip No. 96 was taken on July 4, 1938. Photo measures 3 ¾” x 5” and includes the Captain and Chief Engineer in uniform, cook and five seamen posing on the after deck. Additional man may be an inspector or relative, etc. Such crew photos almost never come along – this one is clear and close, making the uniforms and insignia visible. This was the last lightship built by the Lighthouse Service before it was merged with the U.S. Coast Guard. Labeled on back “Crew ‘Cross Rip’ July 4, 1938 Fred Switzer ‘Lighthouse and Coast Guard Programme’ ‘W.C.O.P.” Clean, crisp. (VG+). $64.

12332. (photo) U. S. Lightship No. 96 Cross Rip c.1950. Close clear view of the Cross Rip Lightship on station off the coast of Nantucket and Cape Cod. Nice view, b/w,  3 ¾” x 3 ¼”, clear and close, shows wonderful detail as she is moored on station despite its small size. LV-96 was built in 1914 in Muskegon, Michigan. She served on Cross Rip Station, north of Tuckernuck, from 1937 until 1954. Nice view.  (VG+). $24.

12429c. (photo) Umatilla Reef Lightship No. 88 c.1941. Unusually large 10” x 12” b/w press photograph shows the Umatilla Lightship No. 88 on station eighteen miles off Tatoosh Island, Washington. The photograph was taken from the Coast Guard Cutter Fir while she was supplying the lightship with 6,000 gallons of water. Includes newspaper article on back with lengthy description of the role of lightships and a bit about the crews. Dated May 31, 1941. Clean, close and clear, a few crop marks. (VG+). $58.

12390. (photo) Nantucket Lightship WLV-612 c.1970’s. Unusually large 13” x 16 ½” b/w print made from the original negative shows the Nantucket I moored on station. The 612 was the last U.S. lightship in commission, retiring in 1983 at age 33. Superb view for framing. (M). $48. (shown cropped due to scanner limitations)

12379. (photo) U. S. Lightship Relief (West Coast) WAL-504 (LV-76). c.1968. Close clear view of the old Lightship No. 76 following her retirement in 1968. Once serving as Relief of San Francisco Bay, she was sold after 56 years of service and renamed the Claire Anne and brought to Seattle. She would be used as a museum, coastal freighter and for fishing. Nice view, b/w, 8” x 10”, clear and close, shows wonderful detail. With credit line on back. Dated August 22, 1968. (F-). $54.

 

11362b. (photo) U.S. Lightship Ambrose LV-111 / WAL-533 c.1946. Clear, close original 8” x 10” press photo shows great detail of the Ambrose Lightship on station guarding New York’s outer harbor. Photo is unusually close and clear. Photo is b/w and includes date and description with newspaper article on back. Dated April 21, 1946. Clear, close view, clean, crisp. Rare view. (VG+). $64.

11362c. (photo) Superstructure, U.S. Lightship Ambrose WLV-613 c.1952. Clear, close original 8” x 10” press photo shows great detail of the 15,000 candle power tripod light structure on Ambrose Lightship at  her station guarding New York’s outer harbor. In 1952, the Lightship Ambrose (WLV 613) was commissioned and became the last lightship to mark the Ambrose Channel when she was replaced by a Texas Tower in August 1967. She was reassigned as a relief ship on the Massachusetts coastline from 1967–75, and then renamed Nantucket II when she was reassigned to Nantucket Shoals. Photo is unusually close and clear. Photo is b/w and includes date and description on back. Dated October 10, 1952. Clear, close view, clean, crisp. Rare view. (VG+). $44.

11362d. (photo) Removing Water from Lifeboat, U.S. Lightship Ambrose WLV-613 c.1952. Clear, close original 8” x 10” press photo shows great detail as the crew overturns a lifeboat on the stern as the lightship steams out of Brooklyn to take her station. The Brooklyn skyline can be seen in the background. Photo is unusually close and clear. Photo is b/w and includes date and description on back. Dated October 10, 1952. Clear, close view, clean, crisp. Rare view. (VG+). $52.

  

12235. (photo) Lightship No 72 Diamond Shoal, NC c.1910. Close photo provides a good view of the lightship moored on station as workers from the lighthouse tender crew row toward the lightship with supplies. The boat appears to be a pulling version of the Monomoy surfboats, with fenders (of the type used by the Life-Saving Service) of 19ft. or 23ft. length. Such boats were used by lighthouse tenders as well, as they were a sturdy boat able to make way in heavy seas. Photo is clear, clean, great early detail, on postcard paper. Postmarked May 19, 1910. 3 ½” x 5 ½”. Rare offshore view. (VG). $88.

 

12252. (photo) Boston Lightship No. 85 c.1962. Clear, close original 7” x 9” United Press photo shows great detail of the Boston Lightship moored in Boston Harbor after decommissioning. She had been service since 1907, and on the Boston station since 1951. She served on Nantucket Shoals from 1907 to 1923, and as a Relief and Examination vessel. She was sold by the Government and used by the Oceanology International group, renamed Recoverer, and home-ported in Chicago. Photo is b/w and includes credit line and description on back. Dated November 15, 1962. Clear and close view. (VG+). $32.

12253. (photo) Boston Lightship No. 85 c.1962. Clear, close original 7” x 9” United Press photo shows great detail of the Boston Lightship moored in Boston Harbor after decommissioning. She had been service since 1907, and on the Boston station since 1951. She served on Nantucket Shoals from 1907 to 1923, and as a Relief and Examination vessel. She was sold by the Government and used by the Oceanology International group, renamed Recoverer, and home-ported in Chicago. Photo is b/w and includes credit line and description on back. Dated November 15, 1962. Clear and close view. (VG+). $32.

12255a. (photo) Nantucket Lightship No. 112 c.1954. Clear, close original 7” x 9” U.S. Coast Guard photo shows great detail of the Nantucket Lightship underway as she enters New Bedford Harbor for repairs, after being hit by Hurricanes Carol and Edna. The commander reported that the steering gear was broken and five portholes on the bridge were smashed out, but the 16-man crew was safe. Photo is b/w and includes credit line and description on back. Dated September 11, 1954. Clear and close view. (VG+). $32.

12255b. (photo) Nantucket Lightship No. 112 and Relief Moored in Boston c.1954. Clear, close original 7” x 9” U.S. Coast Guard photo shows great detail of the Nantucket Lightship No. 112 moored inboard of Relief Lightship. Photo is b/w and includes credit line and description on back. Dated January 1, 1954. Clear and close view. (VG+). $32.

12259. (digital copy photo) Diamond Shoal Lightship WLV-189 c.1962. 8” x 10” digital photo provides great detail of WLV-189 underway in the harbor. The last lightship stationed on Diamond Shoals, WLV 189, was the first lightship built after the Coast Guard took over the Lighthouse Service in 1939, and the first all-welded lightship. She was expressly built for service at this station, and remained in service there until 1966. In the early 1960s, “Texas Tower” lighthouses were erected at six offshore sites on the East coast. Diamond Shoals was the second to last to be built, and was activated in 1966. $18.

  

12316. (mounted photo) Lightship No. 39 c.1895. Fine early view on mount shows Lightship No. 39 moored, probably at the Lighthouse Depot in Woods Hole, Mass., while in use as Relief. Lightship No. 39 was built in 1875 of Wood- white oak & locust; copper & galvanized iron fastened; with 2 masts, daymarks on both; smokestack forward of mainmast. Her illuminating apparatus consisted of 2 lanterns, each with 8 Argand fountain burner oil lamps. Her station assignments included: 1875-1876: Vineyard Sound (MA), 1876-1877: Five Fathom Bank (NJ), 1877-1897: Relief (MA), 1897: Relief (NY), 1897-1935: Brenton Reef (RI). She was retired from lightship duty in 1935 at age 60. Image measures 3 ½” x 4 ½” on 5” x 7” mount. Image is clean and clear. (VG). $34.

12322. (photo) Cross Rip Lightships Nos. 66 and 72 c.1934. Close clear photo shows both the old (LV-66) and the new (LV-72) moored at the Lighthouse Depot in Chelsea, Mass. in 1934. LV-66 served on Cross Rip Station from 1923-1934. LV-72 served on Cross Rip Station from 1934-1937. Nice photo. 2” x 3 5/8”. (VG+). $16.

12338. (photo) U. S. Lightship Relief c.1930’s. Close clear view of a Relief Lightship (may be LV-110, not sure), in port. Nice view. Clear, close, crisp. 3 ½” x 5 7/8”. (VG+). $18.

12339. (copy photo) U. S. Lightship No. 66 Nantucket Shoals c.1900 view. Close clear view of Nantucket Shoals Lightship No. 66. Underway. Copied from original. Close view, some spotting from original. Nice detailed view. 8” x 10”. (VG+). $12.

  

12327. (copy photo) Cross Rip Lightship No. 72 c.1934. Close clear photo shows and the new (LV-72) moored on station at Cross Rip. Pollock Rip Channel and Great Round Shoals Channel converge in Nantucket Sound at the area known as Cross Rip. The only "safe" route for ships at sea between northern New England and New York, there was a need along this route for an extraordinary number of light vessels to mark a safe passage on through to Vineyard Sound, making this area known as "lightship alley". In fact, this channel had the most prolific number of lightships in the world. LV-72 served on Cross Rip Station from 1934-1937. Nice photo, clear, unusually close with great details of the equipment on board. 7” x 10”. (VG+). $20.

12332. (photo) U. S. Lightship No. 96 Cross Rip c.1950. Close clear view of the Cross Rip Lightship on station off the coast of Cape Cod. Nice view, b/w,  3 ¾” x 3 ¼”, clear and close, shows wonderful detail as she is moored on station despite its small size. LV-96 was built in 1914 in Muskegon, Michigan. She served on Cross Rip Station, north of Tuckernuck, from 1937 until 1954. Nice view.  (VG+). $24.

12331. (photo) U. S. Lightship No. 6 Succonnesset Shoal c.1900. Close clear view of the Succonnesset Lightship on station in the north channel of Nantucket Sound, off the coast of Martha’s Vineyard and Cape Cod. Nice view, b/w,  3 ¼” x 2 ¼”, quite close, shows good detail of a portion of the starboard side despite its small size, as she is moored on station. She served on this station from 1862 until 1912, when the station was discontinued. Rare view.  (VG). $22.

12342. (photo) U. S. Lightship No. 72 Cape Charles, VA c.1928. Close clear view of Light Vessel No. 72 on station in Virginia, in water “almost as smooth as a mill pond”. Light Vessel No. 72 served on Cape Charles station from 1927 – 1928, as well as at Diamond Shoals, as Relief, Chesapeake and Cross Rip (MA). She was retired in 1937 at age 37. Nice view, clear, close, crisp. 8” x 10”. Dated January 28, 1928. (VG+). $54.

12352. (photo) U. S. Lightship No. 86 / WAL 511 Hen & Chickens (MA) c.1954. Close clear view of Light Vessel No. 86 on station in Massachusetts. During this year (1954) the Hen & Chickens and Vineyard stations were discontinued and replaced with lighted sound buoys, and with the new Buzzards Bay Lightship Station, in an effort to simplify the entrance to Buzzards Bay and to gain increased efficiency (an annual savings of $220,000). This photo shows the vessel just prior to her being removed and renamed Buzzards Bay. Nice view, clear, close, crisp. 8” x 10” official Coast Guard photo. Dated March 19, 1954. (VG+). $56.

  

12368. (photo) U. S. Lightship No. 110 / WAL 532 Vineyard c.1954. Close clear view of the Vineyard Lightship on station off the coast of Martha’s Vineyard & Cape Cod. Nice view, b/w,  8” x 10” official Coast Guard photo is clear and close, shows wonderful detail as she is moored on station. LV-110 was built in 1923 at the Bath Iron Works in Maine. She served on Vineyard station from 1947 to 1954. During this year (1954) the Hen & Chickens and Vineyard stations were discontinued and replaced with lighted sound buoys, and with the new Buzzards Bay Lightship Station, in an effort to simplify the entrance to Buzzards Bay and to gain increased efficiency (an annual savings of $220,000). This photo shows the vessel just prior to her being removed and placed on the Cross Rip station. Nice view. (VG+). $56.

 

12219. na. New Government Lightships. Scientific American. August 13, 1892. 1p. Full issue. Very detailed article describes the new class of lightships being constructed for Cornfield Point. Light Vessels Nos. 51, 52, 53 and 54 , all 118’ 10” long, built of iron and with the new feature of a “hawse pipe” at the stem. Article includes numerous details and information about this newest design, as well as two quite detailed engravings of No. 51 Cornfield Point. Full issue filled with articles of the day. (VG+). $54.

  

KR-01. (original painting) "Madeleine: Defender of the America's Cup, 1876" by Russ Kramer. Oil on Linen, 26" x 40" 2011. The schooner MADELEINE approaches the SANDY HOOK LIGHTSHIP, outer mark of the second race of the 1876 defense of the America's Cup. Not far behind, and well ahead of the Canadian challenger COUNTESS OF DUFFERIN. is the 25-year-old AMERICA, winner of the original 1851 contest. Crew were stationed aboard the lightship for months on end; surely this day would have been a welcome break from the routine. Today, Russ Kramer is widely regarded to be among the country's leading marine artists. His large-scale studio paintings create 'first-hand' experiences for the viewer, putting you right on board during some of history's greatest yacht races or turn-of-the-century luxury vessels. His works are unique and immediately recognizable, combining narrative, historical, figurative and maritime disciplines. Russ has been the subject of a one-man show at the Museum of Yachting in Newport, Rhode Island, appeared in Wooden Boat, Yachting, and Sail magazines, and will be prominently represented in William Koch's forthcoming book, Art and Artifacts of The America's Cup. He is a Fellow and serves as the current President of the American Society of Marine Artists. This original painting is available, as are limited edition prints. Please inquire.

  

(shown when you frame it.) 

25377. (lithographed print) The Nantucket Lightship by noted Nantucket artist Marshall DuBock. Print is copyright by Nantucket Lithographers Ltd. c.1977 and measures a full 22" by 34". Marshall DuBock has always been fascinated by the inimitable history, personality, and grace of Nantucket Island . DuBock continued his art education at the Portland School of Fine and Applied Art and in Florence , Italy , and throughout the years has carefully developed a realistic watercolor style that distinguishes him as one of Nantucket Island 's most beloved artists. In 1979 he opened The Nantucket Gallery at 23 Federal Street , which offers original watercolors and signed, limited-edition prints. A year-round resident, the artist continues to combine current visual impressions with years of memories abetted by his extensive knowledge of Island history, and as a result he captures the very spirit of the Island in his watercolor paintings, which are known, collected, and loved all over the country. Print is printed on 80-lb. watercolor paper under the direct supervision of the artist. Only a few prints remain available from the artist.  Print is unframed, shipped rolled. $425 each. 

    

7234g,h,i,k,L. Flint , Willard. A HISTORY OF  U. S. LIGHTSHIPS. [U. S. Coast Guard Historian’s Office] 1993. 21p. 8VO. Soft wraps. Of the few persons steeped in the knowledge of this little known branch of the Lighthouse Service, Mr. Flint must surely be considered the leader. In the 1980’s Mr. Flint published the definitive historical record of all lightships and stations for the Coast Guard and this wonderful pamphlet stems from that endeavor. Filled with 29 detailed b/w photographs, this booklet chronicles some of the important history, disasters and life aboard these vessels. A great booklet. (VG).  $28. Reduced $22.

   

12146a. (copy photo) Lightship Charleston LV-34 c.1924. Crystal clear b/w photograph (not digital), taken of the original by a Bethany Beach, Delaware photographer from archive collections, shows lightship LV No. 34 Charleston  on station c. 1924 image. 8” x 10”. Clear, crisp. (F-). $16.

  

12118. Buzzards Bay Lightship – Light Towers to Replace USCG Lightships. All Hands Magazine. December 1960. 64p. Soft wraps. Half page article discusses the trend toward replacing lightships with skeleton structures – the first two being Buzzards Bay and Brenton Reef stations beginning in 1961. With two photos. Magazine is intended for all Naval personnel and contains numerous articles on Navy life, new equipment, decorations and more. Clean, tight. (VG+). $20.

1295. (drawing plate) Details of Revolving Lantern for Lightships. The Engineer. August 22, 1884. 11” x 16”. Page 142 from The Engineer dated 1884 includes detailed sectional views of revolving lantern for lightships. Includes guide rollers, roof ventilator, sills, roof and more. Also includes is photocopy of second page from same article with additional illustrations. Article is not complete here. The Engineer was a London-based fortnightly magazine covering the latest developments and business news in engineering and technology in the UK and internationally. Founded in January 1856, it is among the world's oldest professional journals. The Engineer was established by Edward Charles Healey, an entrepreneur and engineering enthusiast with financial interests in the railways whose friends included Robert Stephenson and Isambard Brunel. Great detail, fine for framing or research. (VG+). $48.

 

  

1266. na. Stonehorse Lightship (LV-101 / WAL-524) Plan & Photo Feature. Model Ship Journal. Vol. 1, No. 2. Winter 2000-2001. pp. 42-47. Great article for the lightship modeler or enthusiast includes specifications and a bit of her history, as well as a number of plans and profiles and detailed photographs. Lightship No. 101 served on Stonehorse Shoal, between Cape Cod’s Monomoy Island and Nantucket, from 1951 to 1963.  Clean, crisp, light moisture to cover. (VG). $22.

23379. Hahn-Pedersen, Morten. DANISH NORTH SEA LIGHTSHIPS. Esbjerg . Denmark 1991 64 p. Soft wraps. Lightships are not uniquely Danish--floating lights have been placed at sea where fixed lights cannot penetrate for over a hundred years. Since the Second World War, technological developments have rendered them obsolete, but they have a fascinating history. This book is the most comprehensive on the subject yet written, with information about the ships' construction, life on board, the seamen who sailed them, and the potential tragedies the lightships have prevented. Filled with excellent vintage photographs. In English. (M).  $38. Reduced $23.

 

8122a. SANDY HOOK LIGHT-SHIP NO. 51. – THE ONLY ELECTRIC LIGHT-SHIP IN THE WORLD. Harper’s Weekly. May 11, 1895 . 1p. Large full page multiple engraving shows interior and deck views of the light vessel. Fine clear illustrations depict both a daylight and night views of the vessel, the dynamo room, the lookout, meal time on board, life-boat drill, and ringing eight bells on the ship’s bell. With copy of half-page article describing the layout and construction of the vessel in some detail. One of the few that I’ve had of this one. Rare interior views of an 1890’s light vessel. Quite clean, nice, great for framing. (VG+). $54.

5308a. LIGHT-SHIP MOORED TO MARK THE WRECK OF OREGON . Harper’s Weekly. April 24, 1886. 1p. Very nice, superb detailed 4½” x 6½” woodcut illustration showing the Wreck of Oregon Light Vessel #20. Close view shows great detail of the day marks, rigging and deck equipment. Clean, nice view. Disbound. (VG). $22

1212. (lot photos) Submarine Signal Company. SUBMARINE SIGNALS. Submarine Signal Company c.1916. Original lot of five photos with descriptions, intended to accompany an article on “submarine signals”” entitled “Fighting the Fog”. Photos provide good detail of the apparatus used to transmit receive signals through the water including the various pieces of equipment used and some of the vessels employing this system. This system was in use extensively on lightships to communicate their position in thick weather. Submerged bells were suspended from lightships and offshore lighthouses as a means of signaling passing vessels. Vessels so equipped had a through-the-hull receiver and could determine the direction from which the signal was coming. The system was used around the world including on lightships, lighthouse tenders, military vessels and more. Photos measure from 3 ½” x 4” to 5” x 7”. 7 pieces. (VG). $20.

11503. (photo) Huron Lightship No. 103 c.1941. Clear, close original 5” x 6 ½” press photo shows good detail of the Huron lightship moored at the Coast Guard Aids to Navigation School in Detroit as Coast Guardsmen learn by actual contact, this phase of lighting the stormy Great Lakes. Photo is b/w and includes date and description on back. Dated December 15, 1941. Clear, close view, wire photo. (VG). $22.

 

11500. (photo) Blunts Reef Lightship No. 83 c.1930. Clear, close original 6” x 8”press photo shows good detail of the Blunts Reef Lightship underway. Built in 1904 in Camden, New Jersey, Lightship No. 83 was one of hundreds of floating lighthouses that guided ships and boats safely along American Coasts. After making the journey around South America to California, LV No. 83 took her position at the Blunts Reef lightship station off Cape Mendicino, where she served for 30 years. Photo is b/w and includes date and description on back. Dated February 22, 1930. Clear, close view, wire photo. (VG). $22.

 

11481. (photo) U.S. Lightship Diamond Shoal No. 105 c.1922. Clear, close original 6” x 8”press photo shows great detail of the Diamond Shoals Lightship returning to station. The largest lightship built to date, LV-105 was the first lightship to be equipped with a radio beacon signal. She was built to replace LV-72, which was sunk by a German submarine in 1918. Photo is b/w and includes date and description on back. Dated May 30, 1922. Clear and close view. (VG+). $68.

11457. (photo) U. S. Coast Guard Lightship Swiftsure WAL-535 (LV-113). c.1960. Close clear view of the Swiftsure Lightship on station off the coast of Washington. Nice view, b/w,  8” x 10”, clear and close, shows wonderful detail as she is re-supplied by the tender. Official Coast Guard photograph with credit line on back. (F-). $38.

  

11464. Jackson, G. Gibbard. Life In a Lightship. Boy's Own Paper. September 1936. 3p. Full issue. Fine article discusses the life aboard these offshore sentinels. From work to sleep, meals to hobbies, life aboard is always interesting despite the obvious dangers. Most interesting account. Full issue includes numerous other articles and advertisements of the day. Clean, tight. (VG). $44.

 

21290c. Cook, George Crouse. THE EVOLUTION OF THE LIGHTSHIP. Transactions of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers. Volume XXI. New York . 1913. Pp.97-118 with additional 10 large fold-out plans and full page photo plate. Quite interesting and detailed article discusses progress made in the design of light vessels around the world, with particular emphasis put on US Light Vessel No. 94 on Frying Pan Shoals in an effort to show the present state of lightship development. Includes design considerations in British and French light vessels through the 1800’s, then discussions on the progress made in this country in the 19th century. Includes lengthy discussions on the evolution hull design in an effort to reduce the rolling, but also discusses propelling machinery, lighting apparatus and more. Of particular interest are the large fold-out plans detailing every aspect of on US Light Vessel No. 94 on Frying Pan Shoals. In addition to a large photo, excellent detailed plan sheets include hull line views, displacement curves, sectional views, large deck plan views, views of lantern, mast and lighting apparatus, sectional and elevation views of main engine, sectional and elevation views of boiler and steam equipment, and more. Disbound from larger volume, clean and crisp. Plans range in size from 10” x 13” to 17” x 25”. A superb document for the researcher or modeler, an interesting and detailed contribution to a little known subject. (VG). $124.

   

11456. (photo) U. S. Coast Guard Lightship Boston WLV-510. c.1960.Close clear view of the Boston Lightship on station. Nice view, b/w,  8” x 10”, clear and close. Official Coast Guard photograph with credit line on back. $28.

11430. (photo) U.S. Lightship Diamond Shoals torn loose by Hurricane Ione c.1955. Clear, close original 7” x 9” press photo shows great detail of the Diamond Shoals Lightship on station. The news caption indicates that she lost her mooring during the hurricane and her 16-man crew was battling heavy seas to maintain her station, 20 miles east of Cape Hatteras. Photo is b/w and includes date and credit line and description on back. Dated September 19, 1955. Clear and close view, some cropping marks. (VG). $38.

722b. (photo) Ambrose Light Vessel LV-11 / WAL-533 c.1930’s. Very close photo taken from a supply ship shows complete details of the vessel and structures as she takes on fresh water. Lighthouse Service pennant flies from the masthead. Clear close view by Underwood. 8” x 10”. Includes credit line and description on back. (VG). $36.

21411b. (photo) Launching Fire Island Lightship LV-114 c.1930. Clear, close original 6” x 8” press photo shows great detail of new lightship as she slides down the ways at Portland, Oregon. This was the first time that the Lighthouse Service commissioned a vessel to be built on the west coast for east coast duty. After fitting out she would make the 6000 mile voyage to the entrance to New York Harbor where she would be stationed. Great detail of the vessel. Photo is b/w and includes description on back. Clear and close view. (VG+). $34.

11412. (photo) U.S. Lightship Diamond Shoal No. 71 c.1937. Clear, close original 8” x 10” press photo shows great detail of the Diamond Shoals Lightship on station. The Captain and crewmen can be seen standing at the rail posing for the photographer. Photo is b/w and includes date and description on back. Dated March 16, 1937. Clear and close view. (VG+). $44.

11459. (photo) Brenton Reef Light-Vessel LV-102 – WAL525 c.1961. (4 ¼” x 6 ¾”) Matted. Wonderful close photograph of racing sloop NOMAD passing the stern of the Brenton Lightship. Clear view, nice detail. A few slight creases to emulsion. Dated October 14, 1961. (VG). $24.

5593. (newspaper) Fear Lightship off Nantucket May Have Sunk…Last Wireless Message to Shore Said that She Was Leaking Badly and in Helpless Condition....  The World. December 11, 1905. On December 10, 1905,  during heavy gale, while relieving Nantucket LV 66, Lightship No. 58 developed a serious leak in the fire-room compartment. Pump suctions clogged repeatedly and distress messages were sent by radio to Newport Naval Station (RI). Rising water eventually extinguished boiler furnaces and ship was then bailed by hand for 24 hours. The USLHS Tender Azalea responded, arriving in the early morning of December 11 and started towing the lightship. Heavy cross seas hindered the operation and about four hours later, lightship signaled "must abandon". The crew was safely taken aboard Azalea and 10 minutes later LV 58, listing heavily to starboard, went down by the stern in 25 fathoms about 18 miles NW of the station. Wonderful early article written as the ship was in distress and awaiting aid. This incident marked the first time in US naval history that a distress message was transmitted by radio. LV No. 58 had one of the first Marconi radios installed for testing in 1901 and it was brought into full-time use in 1904. Most interesting with rare information. Page has been encased in plastic for protection. $36.

5592. (newspaper) Lightship’s Fate a Mystery to Those on Shore. Wireless Message Appealing for Help from Anywhere….  The World. December 12, 1905. On December 10, 1905,  during heavy gale, while relieving Nantucket LV 66, Lightship No. 58 developed a serious leak in the fire-room compartment. Pump suctions clogged repeatedly and distress messages were sent by radio to Newport Naval Station (RI). Rising water eventually extinguished boiler furnaces and ship was then bailed by hand for 24 hours. The USLHS Tender Azalea responded, arriving in the early morning of December 11 and started towing the lightship. Heavy cross seas hindered the operation and about four hours later, lightship signaled "must abandon". The crew was safely taken aboard Azalea and 10 minutes later LV 58, listing heavily to starboard, went down by the stern in 25 fathoms about 18 miles NW of the station. Wonderful early article written as the ship was in distress and awaiting aid. This incident marked the first time in US naval history that a distress message was transmitted by radio. LV No. 58 had one of the first Marconi radios installed for testing in 1901 and it was brought into full-time use in 1904. Most interesting with rare information. Page has been encased in plastic for protection. $36.

5363. (newspaper) The Fire Island Lightship Which Succeeds the Lighthouse. New York Herald. September 5, 1897. Wonderful illustrated article describes the new Lightship No. 68, newly placed on the Fire Island station. Great descriptions of the vessel and life on board as well as illustrations of the vessel, Captain’s cabin, Main Saloon (dining room), and more. Most interesting with rare information. Page has been encased in plastic for protection. $36.

5547. (newspaper) Lightship Crews Lead Very Monotonous Lives….Narrow Escape of Men on Nantucket Shoals Vessel not First in History of Service – Diamond Shoals Ship Once Remained Out Five Months Without Relief…. The Philadelphia Press. February 12, 1906. Detailed article describes life on board these lonely sentinels, the difficulties encountered, a mutinous crew, tragedy on board, and much more. Great account of early experiences on board lightships. Most interesting with rare information and detailed accounts of incidents. Page has been encased in plastic for protection. $36.

11420. Wright, Larry & Patricia. Lightships of the Great Lakes. Severn Bridge. 2011. 146p. Lighthouse historians Larry and Patricia Wright have researched and compiled a wealth of information on lightships all around the Great Lakes including the St. Lawrence River, with a special chapter on vessel designations. Filled with accounts of life aboard these vessels, their history, storms, damage and more, as well as over 100 vintage photos. (M). Published at $29.95. Our price $28.95.

11476. MacKenzie, Morgan. American Lightships, 1820-1983 : History, Construction, and Archaeology within the Maritime Cultural Landscape. Lambert Academic Publishing. 2011. 128p. Soft wraps. Lightships served a vital role in protecting U.S. maritime interests from 1820 to 1983. Employed as navigational aids, lightships were stationed along shipping lanes and intercoastal waterways in the Atlantic, Pacific, Gulf of Mexico, Great Lakes, and various estuarine environments in the Chesapeake, North Carolina, and the Pacific Northwest. Addressing gaps in the current historical and archaeological record pertaining to lightships, this thesis answers different research questions and discusses the role of lightships in the American maritime cultural landscape. The development of lightship construction is included as well as an explanation of changes in wooden, composite, iron, and steel techniques. Information regarding characteristic features of lightships focuses on improvements in light and fog signaling equipment. In total, this historical and archaeological study analyses use, construction, and meaning of lightships in America. (M). $98.

11362. (photo) U.S. Lightship Ambrose WLV-613 c.1960. Clear, close original full 18” x 22” U.S. Coast Guard photo shows great detail of the Ambrose Lightship underway to her station guarding New York’s outer harbor. In 1952, the Lightship Ambrose (WLV 613) was commissioned and became the last lightship to mark the Ambrose Channel when she was replaced by a Texas Tower in August 1967. She was reassigned as a relief ship on the Massachusetts coastline from 1967–75, and then renamed Nantucket II when she was reassigned to Nantucket Shoals. Photo is unusually large and comes from a lot of large U.S. Coast Guard photos. b/w, clear and close view, some damage to edges, tears and creases to lower right corner, 2” tear in sky upper right, edge wear. However, damage does not affect image. Would be striking matted and framed. (G+). $58.

11342. (photo) Lightship RELIEF No. 20 c.1900. Lightship No. 20 served on a number of stations in the northeast from 1867 until 1923, including Wreck of Scotland, Wreck of Oregon, Cross Rip and as Relief. Clear close image is still mounted on album page and measures 3 ½” x 5 ½”. Rare view. (VG). $68.

CJ-01. (collection) U. S. LIGHTSHIPS. Lot includes over 2000 pieces including photos, engravings, books, articles, research, architectural plans and more. This is a research collection for writing books on the subject, acquired over 25 years of collecting. Included are early original photos (70), copy photographs of early images (774), official Coast Guard and press photos (25), recent color photos (43), copy negatives (401), stereoview (1), glass slides (4), early engravings (7), early post cards (42), contemporary post cards (27), magazine articles, etc. (46), books, booklets (6), research photocopies of articles, images, accounts of life on board, etc. (489 pages), Willard Flint Lightships of U.S. Government on discs (2), research, letters from lightship sailors, etc. (6), discs with information and images (4), original U.S. Lighthouse Service specifications, forms, payroll (3), original blueprints and architectural drawings of lightship equipment (11), and more. Entire lot fills 3 banker’s boxes and is an unprecedented find. Essential for writers, museums or advanced Lighthouse Service collectors. $5,995. 

11317. (photo) Lightship RELIEF c.1900. Fine early view of the lightship, possibly on Nantucket station. This early view measures 5” x 7” and is clear and close. (VG+). $74.

  

11309. (negative) Winter Quarter Lightship No. 107 c.1950’s. Original large-format (1 ¾” x 2 ¼”) acetate negative of the Winter Quarter lightship on station, taken from the air. The lightship was built by Bath Iron Works of Bath, ME in 1923, and its first station was Cape Lookout Shoals, NC, where it served from 1924 to 1933. The lightship’s next assignment was at Winter Quarter Shoal, VA, located several miles offshore from Assateague Island. The lightship served to mark the northern approach to Chesapeake Bay in addition to warning mariners of the shoal. With the exception of World War II, the lightship remained on Winter Quarter station through 1960 when it was replaced by a lighted bell buoy. Clear, would provide a clear image. (VG+). $12.

20436d. Chadwick, Lee. LIGHTHOUSES & LIGHTSHIPS. London. 1971. 165p. DJ. The story of warning lights at sea and the people who build and tend them. The author traces the continual search for improved lighting, reviving many of the individual heroic episodes in lighthouse history. The working of lights and construction techniques are outlined and their principles explained, with first-hand accounts of life at various lights and lightships. Nicely illustrated with photographs. Very nice condition, near fine. (F-).  $56.

 

A Must Read !

23439. Lane. Anthony. GUIDING LIGHTS – The Design & Development of the British Lightvessel from 1732. Charleston . 2001. 208 p. Over 200 photographs and illustrations. Soft wraps. Anthony Lane has researched the history of light vessels over a period of many years. Now he has drawn his research into a book that covers the period from 1732 until the present day. These light vessels have protected ships from the sandbanks and treacherous waters surrounding the British Isles throughout war and peace. Until 1986, they were manned by a very special breed of men who lived in arduous conditions to keep the light shining whatever the weather thrown at them. The book is full of drama and technical detail and is a must for any maritime enthusiast. The first lightship in the world was placed at the Nore Sands, at the entrance to the Thames Estuary on the east coast of England , in 1732. About seven years later a lightship was placed at the entrance to the Liffey: it remained on station until around 1782 when the Poolbeg Lighthouse was established. These, and other early lightships were operated by private entrepreneurs as commercial enterprises. The earliest lightships were converted mercantile ships, with lanterns hung from yards. But from the turn of the nineteenth century purpose-built lightships were designed. Through the nineteenth century the number of lightship stations increased. At the beginning of the twentieth century Irish Lights had twelve lightship stations, and three or maybe four spare vessels, but Trinity House had around 65 stations. Dr Lane describes in great detail the construction and arrangement of a typical nineteenth century Trinity House lightship, including the general arrangements, machinery space, crew accommodation, stores, deck machinery, and mooring systems. The first Trinity House all-steel lightship was No 81, completed in 1926. The design of steel lightships varied through the ensuing years. Dr Lane gives a detailed description of a typical steel lightship and also documents changes in the design as they developed over the years. A separate chapter is devoted to lanterns, lights, and optics and another to the various types of fog signaling equipment. Includes superb photographs and information on early burners, reflector lamps and much more. Thanks should go to the author, for there is a wealth of information here that might have been lost had not Dr Lane recorded it. Working life on board Trinity House lightships is described too, and a hard life it was. Includes rarely seen views of crew spaces, working spaces and much more. The book concludes with a chapter on lightvessel automation and records the present whereabouts and condition of the surviving British and Irish light vessels. The book has many excellent photos and drawings showing details of machinery and equipment, vessels, and lightshipmen at work and relaxing. An entire chapter consists of a photographic survey of steel lightships. It is obvious that this book has been meticulously researched and it is likely to become a standard reference book for the future. Now out of print, this book is almost impossible to find. This is surely a Must Read whether you are interested in US or British lightships, many of the photos and information pertain to both and should not be missed. (M).  $76.

23547. [newspaper] PROPOSALS FOR BUILDING AND EQUIPPING FOUR LIGHT VESSELS,  Treasury Dept., Office Lighthouse Board, Washington. The Republic, Wash. D.C., Jan.4, 1853. Over a full front page column headed describes in great detail specifications for three light vessels: One to be delivered at Boston , one to be delivered at a point to be designated by the Board in Vineyard Sound, and for one to be delivered at Smithville, ( Cape Fear ,) North Carolina . Full construction details are included. In addition, on the back page is a 3 1/2" column notice requesting proposals for the erection of a lighthouse on  Minot 's Ledge, War Dept., Bureau Corps Topographical Engineers, signed in type by J. J. Abert, Colonel Corps Topographical Engineers. Full early newspaper contains four pages with articles of the day, light browning and expected wear, 2 folds. (VG-).    $34 net.  

3164i. Kobbe', Gustav. "LIFE ON THE ( Nantucket ) SOUTH SHOAL LIGHT-SHIP". 11pp. Century Magazine, Vol. XLII. August 1891. This often quoted article is one of the very few ever written describing the life on these early light vessels, based on the author’s visit in 1891. One “old whaling captain told me that the loneliest thing he had ever seen at sea was a polar bear floating on a piece of ice in the Arctic Ocean; the next loneliest object to that had been the South Shoal Lightship….and it pitched and rolled such that even an old whaleman… felt ‘squamish’.” Excellent descriptions of the crews and the life on board. Includes nine very nice engravings. Disbound, without wraps. Clean, crisp.     $26. 

3164p,q. Kobbe', Gustav. "LIFE ON THE ( Nantucket ) SOUTH SHOAL LIGHT-SHIP". 11pp. Century Magazine, Vol. XLII. August 1891. This often quoted article is one of the very few ever written describing the life on these early light vessels, based on the author’s visit in 1891. One “old whaling captain told me that the loneliest thing he had ever seen at sea was a polar bear floating on a piece of ice in the Arctic Ocean; the next loneliest object to that had been the South Shoal Lightship….and it pitched and rolled such that even an old whaleman… felt ‘squamish’.” Excellent descriptions of the crews and the life on board. Includes nine very nice engravings. Clean, tight, full issue in well worn wraps. $32 net.

4727. Kobbe', Gustav. "LIFE ON THE ( Nantucket ) SOUTH SHOAL LIGHT-SHIP". 11pp. Century Magazine, Vol. XLII. August 1891. This often quoted article is one of the very few ever written describing the life on these early light vessels, based on the author’s visit in 1891. One “old whaling captain told me that the loneliest thing he had ever seen at sea was a polar bear floating on a piece of ice in the Arctic Ocean; the next loneliest object to that had been the South Shoal Lightship….and it pitched and rolled such that even an old whaleman… felt ‘squamish’.” Excellent descriptions of the crews and the life on board. Includes nine very nice engravings. Clean, tight, full issue in worn wraps. $28.

6593e,f,g,h. Kobbe, Gustav. HEROISM IN THE LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE. A Description of Life on Matinicus Rock. The Century Magazine. 1897. 12p. disbound. Illustrated with 12 very nice engravings, this article describes the life of Abby Burgess and her family at the Matinicus Rock Light Station including her heroism in the winter gale of 1856. Later Abby married Captain Grant and continued her service at Matinicus and later at White Head Light. Most interesting. Illustrations include Keeper Frederick T. Hatch, the only recipient of the Gold Bar for Heroism, Abby Burgess, and more. Quite clean. (VG+).  $34.

3164k,m,n. Kobbe', Gustav. "LIFE ON THE (Nantucket) SOUTH SHOAL LIGHT-SHIP". 11pp. Century Magazine, Vol. XLII. August 1891. This often quoted article is one of the very few ever written describing the life on these early light vessels, based on the author’s visit in 1891. One "old whaling captain told me that the loneliest thing he had ever seen at sea was a polar bear floating on a piece of ice in the Arctic Ocean; the next loneliest object to that had been the South Shoal Lightship….and it pitched and rolled such that even an old whaleman… felt ‘squamish’." Excellent descriptions of the crews and the life on board. Includes nine very nice engravings. Disbound, without wraps. Clean, crisp. $48 net.

957. [lightship model] Nantucket Lightship No. 112. WAL 534. Again we have found this sought after model of the Nantucket Lightship No. 112, by Lindberg Classic Replicas. This unbuilt kit #717, copyright 1986, is a 1/95 scale replica and one of only a few ever designed of a U. S. light vessel It is also fairly close to HO railroading scale of 1/87. It likely had its origins as the Pyro and Frog kit of the same subject in the late 50s. Lindberg bought the molds and produced the kit for a few years. It has been sought after for many years since going out of production in the late 1980’s. This is complete and unopened, in as-new condition and is a perfect way to spend the cold days of winter. This is an exceptional find for you lightship enthusiasts as very few were produced and still fewer have survived. (VG+). $78. Reduced to $68.

11167. (photo) U.S. Lightship Ambrose WLV-613 c.1960. Clear, close original 7” x 9” U.S. Coast Guard photo shows great detail of the Ambrose Lightship moored on station guarding New York’s outer harbor. In 1952, the Lightship Ambrose (WLV 613) was commissioned and became the last lightship to mark the Ambrose Channel when she was replaced by a Texas Tower in August 1967. She was reassigned as a relief ship on the Massachusetts coastline from 1967–75, and then renamed Nantucket II when she was reassigned to Nantucket Shoals. Photo is b/w and includes credit line and description on back. Clear and close view. (VG+). $44.

    

7234L. Flint , Willard. A HISTORY OF  U. S. LIGHTSHIPS. [U. S. Coast Guard Historian’s Office] 1993. 21p. 8VO. Soft wraps. Of the few persons steeped in the knowledge of this little known branch of the Lighthouse Service, Mr. Flint must surely be considered the leader. In the 1980’s Mr. Flint published the definitive historical record of all lightships and stations for the Coast Guard and this wonderful pamphlet stems from that endeavor. Filled with 29 detailed b/w photographs, this booklet chronicles some of the important history, disasters and life aboard these vessels. A great booklet. (VG).  $28.

11233. (photo) Huron Lightship No. 103 c.1941. Dated May 1941. 5” x 7”. $18.

  

11232. (copy photo) Bush Bluff Lightship (VA) No. 97 c.1913-1918. Copy photo of National Archives image. 8” x 10”. Clear, close. $14.

  

1173a. (broadside) NOTICE TO MARINERS NO. 21. SPURN LIGHTSHIP TO BE WITHDRAWN FOR OVERHAUL, HUMBER ESTUARY, NORTHERN COAST OF ENGLAND. May 31, 1935.  Scarce early broadside notes that: “On or about Wednesday, the 3rd July next (or so soon after as the weather and other circumstances will permit), to withdraw, for its overhaul, the Spurn Lightship from its station and to substitute a temporary Lightship therefor. The temporary Lightship, which will be painted black with the word SPURN in white letters on each side, will carry a ball at the mast-head 54 feet above the water line, and wikll exhibit by night a flashing white acetylene light, giving 3 flashes, each of 5 seconds duration, every 9 seconds, at an elevation of 37 fet from the water line. During foggy weather, a reed fog signal will be sounded every 20 seconds, giving 2 blasts of 2 seconds duration, with an interval between blasts of 2 seconds. The temporary lightship will NOT be equipped with the Wireless Beacon Fog Signal and Synchronous Signal, the Submarine Oscillator Fog Signal and the Nsutophone Above-wave of Oral Fog Signal.” This early broadside measures 8 ¼” x 13” and is nicely matted. Clean, crisp, in original light green stock, will be most attractive for when matted and framed. (VG-). $48.

1173b. (broadside) NOTICE TO MARINERS NO. 27. SPURN LIGHTSHIP TO BE REPLACED ON STATION, HUMBER ESTUARY, NORTHERN COAST OF ENGLAND. July 23, 1935.  Scarce early broadside notes that: “Referring to Notice To Mariners No. 21, issued by this Board on the 31st May last, Notice is Hereby Given that it is intended on Wednesday, the 31st instant (or so soon after as the weather and other circumstances will permit), to replace the Spurn Lightship on its station and to withdraw the temporary Lightship.” This early broadside measures 8 ¼” x 9” and is nicely matted. Clean, crisp, in original light green stock, will be most attractive for when matted and framed. (VG-). $48.

21263. Butterfield, A. E., REPORT ON THE LIGHTHOUSES, LIGHTSHIPS, LIGHT FLOATS, BUOYS AND VESSELS BELONGING TO THE BOARD. Humber Conservancy Board. Beverley, GB. 1939. 55p. Gilt embossed wraps. The Humber Conservancy Board had jurisdiction for maintaining the lighthouses, lightships and other aids for navigation along the river Humber from Spurn Head to Blacktoft. In this superb report, the Board details all equipment and aids maintained by the board. Extensive vintage photographs, drawings, architectural plans and extensive text detail the various beacons, light towers, shore lights, light vessels with photos and sectional plans, submarine signals, light floats, light buoys, steam vessels owned by the Board including yachts, launches and tenders, wreck marking system and more. Also includes a complete light-list. Well done with great detail. Clean, crisp, nice copy. (F-). $128 net.

11120. (photo) U.S. Lightship Brenton Reef c.1955. Clear, close original 7” x 9” press photo shows great detail of the Brenton Reef Lightship moored at Boston’s Constitution Wharf for its yearly overhaul. Men can be seen working on the hull, smokestack, deck and other areas in this close view. After the month-long overhaul, she will return to her station off Newport, Rhode Island. Photo is b/w and includes date and credit line and description on back. Dated November 6, 1955. Clear and close view. (VG+). $74.

11121. (photo) U.S. Lightship Ambrose c.1973. Clear, close original 7” x 9” press photo shows great detail of the Ambrose Lightship moored at the South Street Seaport Museum pier, after 50 years of guarding New York’s outer harbor. Photo is b/w and includes date and credit line and description on back. Dated October 14, 1973. Clear and close view. (VG+). $44.

11122. (photo) U.S. Lightship Chesapeake on station c.1936. Clear, close original 7” x 9” press photo shows great detail of the Chesapeake Lightship on station off Cape Henry, Virginia. At the time that this image was used in the paper, she had broken from her mooring and was drifting as a hurricane worked its way up the coast. The Coast Guard cutter Mendots was attempting to reach the vessel which had sent a message requesting assistance. Photo is b/w and includes date and credit line and description on back. Dated September 18, 1936. Clear and close view. (VG+). $44.

 

1183. (photo) New U.S. Lightship Ambrose Taking Station c.1952. Clear, close original 7” x 9” press photo shows great detail of the new Ambrose Lightship taking station in 1952. In the background can be seen Lightship Relief, which had been on the Ambrose station since 1926. The crew of the Relief was transferred to the new vessel, which boasted the latest in submarine signals, radio beacon, fog signal, as well as a library and television for the crew. Photo is b/w and includes date and credit line and description on back. Dated October 7, 1952. Clear and close view. (VG+). $64.

   

1176. (photo) Lightship No. 115 Frying Pan c.1930. Original photo shows LV No. 115 tied up at a pier in Charleston, SC as she is fitted out during construction. Nice clear, close view. Rare to see such construction views. 2 ¾” x 4 ½”. (VG+). $44.

1182. (photo) U.S. Lightship Diamond Shoals torn loose by Hurricane Ione c.1955. Clear, close original 7” x 9” press photo shows great detail of the Diamond Shoals Lightship on station. The news caption indicates that she lost her mooring during the hurricane and was battling heavy seas to maintain her station, 20 miles east of Cape Hatteras. Photo is b/w and includes date and credit line and description on back. Dated September 1955. Clear and close view. (VG+). $48.

1184. (photo) U.S. Lightship Buzzards Bay on station c.1960. Clear, close original 7” x 9” press photo shows great detail of the Buzzards Bay Lightship moored on station at the approach to the Cape Cod Canal. The news caption indicates that she was built in 1923 and is to be one of the first to be replaced by fixed offshore “Texas Tower” type lights, to begin in 1961. Photo is b/w and includes date and credit line and description on back. Dated August 1960. Clear and close view. (VG+). $84.

  

2667. (lithographed print) Ambrose Channel Relief Lightship No. 78 Struck by SS Green Bay by Dianna Garrison. Limited edition lithographed print, signed and numbered of 2000 by noted North Carolina artist Dianna Garrison  is a sought after work of art. Originally painted by popular marine artist Dianna Garrison, image is printed on quality stock paper with fade resistant inks. The Relief Lightship No. 78 / WAL 505 was struck and sunk by the freighter SS Green Bay after 4:00am on June 24, 1960 in dense fog. The Freighter SS Green Bay, outbound from New York Harbor in dense fog and zero visibility, collided with the USCG Lightship RELIEF  No. 78 / WAL505 on Ambrose Channel Lightship Station (relieving Ambrose Lightship WLV 613). Relief was rammed amidships on the starboard side, resulting in a jagged hole at least two feet wide extending from the weather deck & narrowing downward towards the keel. The Relief sank on station approximately ten  minutes later. No lives were lost, as all nine crewmen abandoned ship in a inflatable life raft. The overall size is 19.5 x 24 inches, the total image size is 16.5 x 22 inches. Titled in script “The Ambrose channel Relief Lightship moments before the collision with the Freighter Green Bay June 29th 1960.”[official records indicate June 24 as the date of collision]. Beautifully done, would be perfect framed. New, shipped rolled. All prints are signed and numbered by the artist in a limited edition of 2000 prints and are printed on heavy weight paper under the direct supervision of the artist.  Numbers #1349 + of 2000 available. (M). $34.95.

ERS-02. (lot) Lightship Photos, Newspaper Articles, Research Materials. Lot is from Edward Rowe Snow’s research files and includes three folders of information on Lightship Nos. 114, No. 98, and No. 116. Included are newspaper and periodical clippings, articles, four b/w and one color photographs, etc. About 20-25 items. $55.

Just in!

  

1103. McCarthy, James F. “Jay”. Collision at Sea – The True Story of the Collision and Sinking of U.S.C.G. Lightship RELIEF LV-78 / WAL-505, and Other Memories and Photos of Life Aboard RELIEF Lightship 78/505. Infinity. 2010. 84p. Lightships were often called floating lighthouses - they were stationed where it would not be practicable to place a lighthouse, in exposed and dangerous locations, such as, far out to sea in deep water, close in to shore with soft sandy bottoms or treacherous and shifting shoals, in busy shipping channels or wherever maritime needs dictated. Often, the defenseless lightship, anchored and incapable of avoiding a collision, paid the ultimate price for remaining in this hazardous and vulnerable position. This is a true story of one such collision. The author, James F. “Jay” McCarthy, served 2 years on the RELIEF Lightship LV-78/WAL-505. He speaks with firsthand knowledge of the ship and crew. He was shipmates with a number of the crew that survived the collision by the freighter SS Green Bay and the sinking of the lightship. He tells the whole story - pre-collision, collision and post-collision and draws from excerpts of the Official U.S.C.G. Joint Marine Board of Investigation into the collision between the SS Green Bay and the USCG Lightship RELIEF 78 / WAL 505, and the survivors story, as told largely in the words and memories of RELIEF LV 78/505 survivor Bobbie R. Pierce, BM3. He attempts to tell this story in chronological order, with a view into what was occurring on both ships during this timeframe. Most interesting look into the lives and dangers of these “lightship sailors”. Well illustrated with crew and ship photos. (M). $11.95. 

1127. SKETCHES ON BOARD A LIGHTSHIP. The Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News. July 26, 1884. 1p. Beautiful full page multiple engravings of 8 scenes on board a lightship including Skipper’s Cabin, Fog Signal, Galley, Recreation, Oil Room, In the Lantern, Mushroom Anchor, and more. Measures 9 ½” x 14 ½”. Quite clean and bright, margin has been trimmed, beautiful for framing. (VG+). $46.

 

J-53. [water color] Original w/c painting Great Round Shoal Light Vessel No. 86 [1913] Superb original water color shows the Great Round Shoals Light Vessel No. 86 at anchor on station off Nantucket, Massachusetts. Nice depiction of this early coal fired vessel, with great detail of the vessel and its equipment as she rolls in the choppy seas. Painting measures 13” x 26” and is professionally matted and framed to 18" x 31". Painting is signed in lower left corner "I. N. Cory 12-17-1913." Condition is excellent, perfect you museum or collector. $875 net

   

23446a, b, c. (lot 3 mounted photos). U.S. Lightship No 94 Frying Pan Shoals c.1911. Wonderful set of three rare mounted photos show Lightship No. 94 as she travels via canals to her first station on the East Coast. In 1911, a 135'9" lightship, No. 94 was built in Muskegon, Michigan, by the Racine-Truscott-Shell Lake Boat Co. That same year the vessel sailed from Lake Michigan to Montreal...and then presumably to her first station at Frying Pan Shoal, North Carolina where she served from 1911 to 1930. When she was constructed she was considered by the Lighthouse Service to be the “most highly developed” lightship in the fleet. Photos are clear and crisp and measure 2 ½” x 4 ¼” on 4” x 6” mounts. Views include a fine bow view of the Lightship coming through one of the canals, a closeup of the forward portion of the vessel and a closeup of the open bridge with officer and others on board. Fine clear, close views. (VG+). $188.

 

28105. (photo lot) Abandoned Lightship ?. Superb lot of six b/w photographs shows great detail of an abandoned British light vessel moored high and dry on the beach. Vessel has a hull entirely of wood, with the tall central mast and large lantern still intact. Photos provide great detail of the lantern and apparatus, hull, deck, rudder and more. Vessel may be abandoned, or may be undergoing repairs, its fate is not clear. Would guess images to be c.1930-1950.Nice lot. (VG+). $144.

 26100. (framed photograph) Succonnessett Light Ship No. 6. Light Ship No. 6 was built in 1855 at Somerset, Mass. She was oak framed and planked, 2 masts with a single daymark at the masthead. She was 80 feet long and was schooner rigged. Her lighting apparatus consisted of a single lantern on the mainmast, 8 oil lamps w/reflectors. During her career she served on Succonnesset Shoal (MA) 1862-1912:, 1912-1915: Relief (MA), Cross Rip (MA) 1915-1918. On February 4, 1918, she lost her anchor in a severe storm and went adrift trapped in pack ice. She was reported drifting slowly eastward in moving ice and on February 5 was sighted by the keeper of Great Point Lighthouse still trapped in heavy ice east of the Great Round Shoal lightship. The Lighthouse Tender AZALEA, Relief LV 90, and naval vessels were dispatched to the area to search but nothing found. She was lost with 6 men aboard. In 1933 the Government dredge W L MARSHALL found parts of frame, planking and windlass believed to be from LV 6. Photo is a large, b/w measuring 11” x 14” and is mounted on mat and framed to 16” x 18 ½”. Below the photo typed description is mounted below the photo. Close, clear view. Presentable with some cleaning, or would be striking if re-matted and framed. (VG-). $235.

28272. (photo) Royal Sovereign Lightship. January 10, 1927. National News Photo. 6” x 8” b/w. From the credit line on obverse: “The new Royal Sovereign Lightship, 7 miles off Eastbourne, equipped with a powerful electric light, submarine oscillator, wireless, and a larger crew than the old type of lightship that was taken off duty.” Nice clear, close view of the vessel and desk equipment. Close, rare view, some wear, fading. (VG). $48.

2882. (magic lantern glass slide) U. S. Lightship underway. c.1890-1910. Beautiful b/w  glass projection slide features a U. S. lightship underway on a New England river. The vessel looks freshly painted and may be new. Slide manufactured in Boston.  Slide measures 3 ¼” x 4” and presents a fine, clear image, much better than that shown. (F).  $24.

 

28167. (photo) Goodwin Sands Lightship. 3” x 3 ¾” b/w. (VG). $29.

21154. [ Columbia Lightship video] Columbia River Lightship – An Exploration Northwest Adventure. 1976. Don McCune Library. This video beautifully illustrates life aboard the Columbia River Lightship in the 1970’s, and Columbia River Bar history. Shot on 16mm color film in 1976. 30 minutes, VHS format. Interviews on board include CWO Elmer A. Stevens, Captain, who noted "You always have the fear of a ship running you down. In foul weather, the visibility drops. There's 90 mile-an-hour winds out there ... a ship bearing down on you. If your radar is out, you're in a terrible fix. [Launching a buoy] is the most dangerous work there is, bar none, in the service. We've had guys get caught between the buoys and the gunwales and get injured. That chain's whipped and broke their legs. There's been several lightships sunk in the fog; the [lightship] Nantucket was sunk and they never found anything. During a storm when the wind picks up over fifty knots, we start our engines up and keep them on one-third ahead to take the strain off the [anchor] chain and we have run forty hours like that."  Video also includes footage of Relief, which replaced the Columbia during schedule maintenance. Interesting one-of-a-kind footage about life on board a lightship. (M).  $15.95.

2674b. (set of slides). Portsmouth, Five Fathom, Barnegat, Huron Lightships c.1970’s. Set of 11 different Kodak photographic slides show great overall views of the four vessels. Nice set, full color. (VG+). $10.  

4560d. THE SANDY HOOK LIGHT-SHIP. Harper’s Weekly. September 27, 1879. 7” x 9½”. Fine close, detailed half-page woodcut engraving of the Sandy Hook Light Vessel No. 16 on station, tossing in the winter sea, with a yacht crossing its bow. Nice detail showing both masts with day recognition signals and deck structures. Includes article on lightships and buoys. Unusually clean, great detail, beautiful for display. (VG+). $44.

6587c. THE SANDY HOOK LIGHT-SHIP. Harper’s Weekly. September 27, 1879 . 7” x 9½”. Drawn by F. S. Cozzens. Fine close, detailed half-page woodcut engraving of the Sandy Hook Light Vessel on station, tossing in the sea,  with a yacht crossing its bow. Nice detail showing both masts with day recognition signals and deck structures. Unusually clean, in as nice a condition as I have yet found, beautiful for display. Near fine, full issue. (F-). $54.

Just Arrived: 

Lightships of the United States of America Volumes I, II, III by Thomas Schoenewolff:

The 3 volumes of Lightships of the United States of America consist of a comprehensive listing of all the lightships that served under the lighthouse service and the Coast Guard. Each ship is outlined with the technical specifications of service, officers, and crews of each ship. The data and information includes all of the research done by noted lightship historian Willard Flint, as well as from other sources across the country, organizations and historical archives, providing a comprehensive view of the history of each ship. These volumes provide the reader with a complete historical reference of the lightship service in this country. Also included are hundreds of photographs of the lightships including on-station photographs, mechanical drawings, officers, crews and more.

10453a. Schoenewolff, Thomas. Lightships of the United States of America, Volume I – Northeast. RoseDog Books. 2010. Soft wraps. 368p. $61.

10453b. Schoenewolff, Thomas. Lightships of the United States of America, Volume II – Southeast. RoseDog Books. 2010. Soft wraps. 146p.  $28.

10453c. Schoenewolff, Thomas. Lightships of the United States of America, Volume III – Gulf, Western, Great Lakes. RoseDog Books. 2010. Soft wraps. 188p.  $38.

27418. (photo) Control panel for Experimental Lightship No. 99. c.1950. Lightship No. 99 was constructed in 1916. She was assigned to a number of stations on the Great Lakes and the East Coast until 1949, when  the Coast Guard modified Lightship No. 99 to an unmanned, experimental radio-controlled vessel named Exp or Exp-99, and later Sandy Hook Experimental Lightship. The vessel was to have a "crew" of electronic devices operating automatically or controlled by radio from shore. Each of its signals --marker light, foghorn, radio beacon, and bell -- is either duplicated or otherwise arranged to defy failure. Cost of the new ship was $375, 000 --just half of a manned lightship. An annual saving of $59,000 in maintenance and personnel was also anticipated. The vessel was moved to the Coast Guard's Third District headquarters at Staten Island, New York, in May 1950, for a three-month experimental trial run at the Ambrose station. However, the experiment was postponed indefinitely and the experimental vessel was apparently never used. Original b/w photo is by Acme News Pictures and includes news description dated April 29, 1950. Photo measures 7” x 9” and is clean and clear, light wear only. (VG). $54.

(photos) Huron Lightship No. 103 and No. 61. c.1934 – 1953. Clear, close original 8” x 10” (unless otherwise noted) press photos shows great detail of the Huron Lightships at various times and include her crew, equipment, underway and more. Photos are b/w and include date and credit line or description on back. May have a few crayon marks from cropping:

   

10327. Lightship Huron moored at Lighthouse Depot dock as Captain and crew poses on deck. March 28, 1938. $138.

  

10379. Lightship Huron moored at Lighthouse Depot dock as crewmen clean masthead light. April 19, 1953. $48.

10378. Lightship Huron as a museum at Pine Grove Park in Port Huron, Michigan. September 28, 1983. $34.

10369. (photo) Fog Signal Bell, Experimental Lightship No. 99 c.1950. Original 8” x 10” press photo shows great detail of the 1000 pound fog signal bell and striking mechanism on the foredeck of Lightship No. 99. Lightship No. 99 was built in 1920 and served on the Great Lakes before being transferred to the Third District. There she was converted to a radio-controlled vessel as an experiment but she was apparently never used. Dated April 29, 1950. Clear and close view. (VG+). $42

10261. (copy photo) Poe Reef Lightship No. 99. c.1925. Close view of LV No. 99 alongside lighthouse tender. Close 8” x 10” early copy photo shows great detail. LV No. 99 served on Poe Reef (MI) station form 1921-1929. $24.

(photos) Lake St. Clair Lightship No. 75. c.1931 – 1938. Clear, close original 8” x 10” (unless otherwise noted) press photos shows great detail of the Lake St. Clair Lightship No. 75 at various times and include her crew, equipment, underway and more. Photos are b/w and include date and credit line or description on back. May have a few crayon marks from cropping.

    

10285. Lightship Lake St. Clair before automation on station. April 19, 1931. 5” x 7”. $165.

(photos) Swiftsure Bank Lightship No. 113 c.1939. Clear, close original 8” x 10” (unless otherwise noted) press photos shows great detail of the Swiftsure Bank Lightship at various times and include her crew, equipment, underway and more. Photos are b/w and include date and credit line or description on back. Swiftsure Bank was located west of Cape Flattery, Washington and LV No. 113 served on that location for 12 years. May have a few crayon marks from cropping:

  

10329a,b. (photo) Swiftsure Bank Lightship No. 113 c.1939. Clear, close original 7” x 9” press photos shows great detail of the Swiftsure Bank Lightship moored on station in moderate swells on a clear day. Her two 15,000-candlepower lights were visible 14 miles from the mastheads 65 feet above the vessel’s waterline. Swiftsure Bank was located west of Cape Flattery, Washington and LV No. 113 served on that location for 12 years. Photo is b/w and includes date and credit line or description on back. Dated November 17, 1939. Rare view. (VG). $95.

10337. Seaman sounds the ship’s fog bell by hand on the Swiftsure Bank Lightship No. 113. November 17, 1939. Rare view. 7” x 9”. $110.

10384. Captain Erick Lindman and seaman inspect the ship’s fog bell in a driving rain on the Swiftsure Bank Lightship No. 113. November 17, 1939. Rare view. 7” x 9”. $110.

 

2696. (painting) John W. Hutchinson Jr. (1940-). HANDKERCHIEF SHOAL LIGHTSHIP NO. 4. c.1987. #547. This is an authentic, signed original water color on artist’s board by Chatham and Cape Ann’s own artist, John Hutchinson. This bright rendition measures 6 inches by 9 inches, framed to 14" x 17" and is signed in the bottom right hand corner by the artist. Light Vessel No. 4 was built in 1855 and served on Handkerchief Shoal at the entrance to Nantucket Sound from 1858 until 1916. “Hutch” has lived for years in Salem on Massachusetts' North Shore and summers at a lovely spot near Chatham Lighthouse on the elbow of Cape Cod. He has become well known for his maritime and pilot boat views, as well as salt marsh and general coastal. Now nearing his sixties Hutch still paints with vengeance. Today John Hutchinson is one of Massachusetts’ best known artists his works have been sold all over the east. Wonderful, bright, in a mat and old frame but could use re-framing. (F).  $248 net. 

  Columbia River Light Ship No. 50  

#24184. LV 50 was a wooden-hulled vessel constructed in San Francisco and housed two coal-fired boilers, which produced steam for a twelve-inch fog whistle. Three oil lamp lenses, used to alert vessels at night, topped the ship's two masts. The ship had no engine for propulsion, but was equipped with sails in case the anchor chain, which held the vessel at a position roughly five miles west of the  Columbia River 's mouth, broke. During a severe storm on the evening of November 28,1899, the chain did break. The crew quickly set the sails and kept the vessel from grounding. After several attempts to tow the ship to safety failed the next day, the vessel was intentionally grounded at McKenzie Head near  Cape Disappointment . The Lighthouse Service contracted house-movers Allen & Roberts Co. of Portland,  Oregon to move the lightship ½ mile overland on rails. Eighteen months later, after the ship was successfully hauled 700 yards overland,  LV 50 was launched into  Baker Bay in the  Columbia River . The ship returned to station in August of 1901, after a trip to  Portland for repairs. This rare album of 35 original 6” x 7 ½” photographs by Photographer J. F. Ford, chronicles the move in unprecedented detail. The album was put together by Allen & Roberts and presented to Captain Joseph H. Harriman of Light Ship No. 50 on July 18, 1901. Cover inscribed “Presented to Captain Jos. H. Harriman, Capt.  Of  U.S.  Light Ship No. 50 July 18, 1901.” Exceptional lot in original string-bound album pages as presented.  $2,995. Reduced $2,495.

13288.  (glass plate negative) Lightship No. 85 Nantucket Shoals c.1908. Photo by William H. Tripp, New Bedford, Mass. Clear glass plate negative captures nicely the newly constructed steam screw steel-hulled light vessel moored in New Bedford prior to marking the dangerous Nantucket Shoals. LV-85 would serve on Nantucket Shoals from 1907 to 1923. Large image measures 4” x 5” and is clear and close. Would provide a clear print image. Rare image. (VG+). $95.

 

C13202. (copy plans) U.S. Coast Guard’s NANTUCKET lightship  No. 112 c.1960-1975 configuration.   Scale 1:48.. 2 sheets. 36” x 41”. Set two large, detailed plan sheets intended for model builders detail all aspects of the vessel construction and equipment. Included are starboard view and sectional profile of the ship, plus deck plans and interior view of spaces and machinery. Fine detail, large clear sheets. 2 sheets. $22.

 

13276. (glass plate photograph/projection slide) Vineyard Sound Lightship No. 41 at New Bedford c.1891. Lightship No. 41 was built at Portland , Maine by S. Gildersleeve & Sons for a cost of $33,000. She was constructed of white oak & locust; copper & galvanized iron fastened; with a bowsprit; 2 masts with daymarks; stack forward of mainmast; 2 aux. steam boilers. She served on the Vineyard Sound station from 1876-1910, and 1915-1924. The lightship and crew were instrumental in a number of rescues including the S.S. Seaconnet and the Lighthouse Tender Anemone. LV-41 also served on Hedge Fence and Handkerchief Shoal stations. Glass projection image is clear and crisp and measures 3 ¼” square on white 4” overall on square mount. Image is clear and crisp. (F-). $178.

13282. (photo) Relief Lightship c.1940. Rare early press photo shows a very close detailed view of a relief lightship underway. Great, close clear view. Vessel not identified. Measures 8” x 10”. Quite clear and close, good condition. Rare view. (VG+). $54.

13261. (photo) Blunts Reef, California, Lightship No. 100 Crew at Mess c.1946. Rare early press photo shows the crew “chowing down” at mess on the Blunts Reef Lightship. Rare interior view of light vessel provides great detail. Note the white with blue logo Coast Guard china. Measures 8” x 10”. Quite clear and close, good condition. Rare view. (VG+). $48.

 

13250. Willey, D.A., The Dry Land Voyage of Lightship '50'. Wide World Magazine. nd. c.1900. 5p. Disbound. LV 50 was a wooden-hulled vessel constructed in San Francisco and housed two coal-fired boilers, which produced steam for a twelve-inch fog whistle. Three oil lamp lenses, used to alert vessels at night, topped the ship's two masts. The ship had no engine for propulsion, but was equipped with sails in case the anchor chain, which held the vessel at a position roughly five miles west of the Columbia River 's mouth, broke. During a severe storm on the evening of November 28,1899, the chain did break. The crew quickly set the sails and kept the vessel from grounding. After several attempts to tow the ship to safety failed the next day, the vessel was intentionally grounded at McKenzie Head near Cape Disappointment . The Lighthouse Service contracted house-movers Allen & Roberts Co. of Portland, Oregon to move the lightship ½ mile overland on rails. Eighteen months later, after the ship was successfully hauled 700 yards overland, LV 50 was launched into Baker Bay in the Columbia River . The ship returned to station in August of 1901, after a trip to Portland for repairs. Very good account of the remarkable cruise by this American lightship. Illustrated with seven photos. (VG+). $44.

 

10104. (copy photo) U.S. Lighthouse Service, Tompkinsville Depot, Staten Island c.1900. 8” x 10”. Great digital copy photograph, clear image from original photo, shows the pier at the Lighthouse Depot with stores stockpiled for the lightships moored alongside. Labeled “Loading lightships with stores, Tompkinsville”. Shipped flat. $18. 4” x 6” size $9. 

 

Signed by the author:

 

6697. Thompson, Frederic L., THE LIGHTSHIPS OF CAPE COD. 1996. 2nd printing. 112 pp. Soft wraps. Signed by the author. Illustrated with over 93 beautifully detailed photographs. Much sought after, this scarce volume chronicles the history of the lightships in this vital area. Wonderfully detailed b/w photographs enhance the author's vivid description of the history and life aboard these vessels. One of the only volumes ever written exclusively on this subject, this fine work will make a fine addition to any library (M). $14.95. (Wholesale discounts available)

   

1072a. [glass projection slide] Hedge Fence Lightship No. 90 c.1908-1910. Excellent  b/w glass projection slide features a close, clear view of the Hedge Fence Lightship No. 90. Hedge Fence station marked a dangerous shoal on the north side of Nantucket Sound. Light Vessel No. 90 served on that station from 1908 to 1910. The glass slide is large 3 ¼” x 4” and would provide a large clear view. Fine, clear image although superstructure appears to have faded from the view. Quite detailed of the hull, rare. (VG-). $24.

1072b. [glass projection slide] Boston Lightship No. 54 c.1908-1910. Excellent  b/w glass projection slide features a close, clear view of the Boston Lightship No. 54. Boston station marked the harbor approaches, six miles ESE of Boston Light. Light Vessel No. 54 served on that station from 1894 to 1940. The glass slide is large 3 ¼” x 4” and would provide a large view. Good  image although appears to have some edges faded from the view. (VG-). $22.

1030. (Pay Roll Forms No. 7) U.S. Lightship No. 13 Bartlett’s Reef c.1876. Original pay vouchers are signed in hand by each member of the crew in receipt for wages paid for the period April 1, 1876 to June 30, 1876. Includes the Principal Keeper (Master) David G. Miner ($162.50), Mate William F. Chappell ($105), and all other members of the crew including Cook and “Team” (4). Pay and Receipt Roll is also signed in hand by the Lighthouse Inspector, 3rd. District. Lightship #13 had a long career. She was schooner built in 1854 by J. Hood of Somerset, Mass. and was one of four light vessels built by him. Her career lasted 79 years from 1854 – 1933. No. 13 first took various stations on Nantucket Sound from 1854-55; Succonnessett, Mass. 1855-62; Relief 1862-1867; Bartlett's Reef 1867-1933. This rare lot consists of two sheets: The first is a large folded sheet listing the crew of the vessel by name, their rank, term of service, amount of pay and their personal signature with signature of witness. It is also signed by the Master, David C. Miner and the Light-House Inspector. This one measures about 14 x 17.  Clean, crisp, with 16 small holes throughout from early binding. Second voucher for Keeper’s Salary form measures 6 ½” x 8 ¼” and is signed by the Master, David C. Miner. Superb early pieces on this interesting Light House Establishment vessel would make an exceptional addition to any collection or display. (VG). $225.

1077. (advertisement) Nantucket Lightship - Wolf's Head Marine Oils c.1950. Bright, clean, 2-color advertisement measures 11 ¾” x 8 ½”. From Motor Boating Magazine, April 1950. Perfect for framing. (VG+). $24.

  

(shown when you frame it.) 

25377. (lithographed print) The Nantucket Lightship by noted Nantucket artist Marshall DuBock. Print is copyright by Nantucket Lithographers Ltd. c.1977 and measures a full 22" by 34". Marshall DuBock has always been fascinated by the inimitable history, personality, and grace of Nantucket Island . DuBock continued his art education at the Portland School of Fine and Applied Art and in Florence , Italy , and throughout the years has carefully developed a realistic watercolor style that distinguishes him as one of Nantucket Island 's most beloved artists. In 1979 he opened The Nantucket Gallery at 23 Federal Street , which offers original watercolors and signed, limited-edition prints. A year-round resident, the artist continues to combine current visual impressions with years of memories abetted by his extensive knowledge of Island history, and as a result he captures the very spirit of the Island in his watercolor paintings, which are known, collected, and loved all over the country. Print is printed on 80-lb. watercolor paper under the direct supervision of the artist. Only a few prints remain available from the artist.  Print is unframed, shipped rolled. $425 each. 

 

29337a,b. na. [Lightship] No. 50’s Voyage on Land. Harper’s Weekly. March 28, 1903. 1p. LV 50 was a wooden-hulled vessel constructed in San Francisco and housed two coal-fired boilers, which produced steam for a twelve-inch fog whistle. The ship had no engine for propulsion, but was equipped with sails in case the anchor chain, which held the vessel at a position roughly five miles west of the Columbia River 's mouth, broke. During a severe storm on the evening of November 28,1899, the chain did break. The crew quickly set the sails and kept the vessel from grounding. After several attempts to tow the ship to safety failed the next day, the vessel was intentionally grounded at McKenzie Head near Cape Disappointment . The Lighthouse Service contracted house-movers Allen & Roberts Co. of Portland, Oregon to move the lightship ½ mile overland on rails. Eighteen months later, after the ship was successfully hauled 700 yards overland, LV 50 was launched into Baker Bay in the Columbia River . The ship returned to station in August of 1901, after a trip to Portland for repairs. One page article with two photo illustrations details this remarkable voyage. Full issue with other interesting articles of the day. (VG+). $56.

23318. THE BUOY STATION, QUARANTINE LANDING, STATEN ISLAND and THE SANDY HOOK LIGHTSHIP Harper's Weekly. September 27, 1872. Fine close, detailed half-page woodcut engravings drawn by F. S. Cozzens detail the U.S. Light House Establishment buoy dock on Staten Island with quantities of buoys lined up on the dock, and with a lightship and tender moored behind. A second half page engraving beautifully details the Sandy Hook Light Vessel on station, tossing in the sea with a yacht crossing its bow. Nice detail showing both masts with day recognition signals and deck structures. Full issue with accompanying article describes the use of lightships and buoys and the work of the service. Wonderful piece. Unusually clean, crisp, beautiful for display. (VG+). $66 net.

23318d. THE BUOY STATION, QUARANTINE LANDING, STATEN ISLAND and THE SANDY HOOK LIGHTSHIP Harper's Weekly. September 27, 1879. Fine close, detailed half-page woodcut engravings drawn by F. S. Cozzens detail the U.S. Light House Establishment buoy dock on Staten Island with quantities of buoys lined up on the dock, and with a lightship and tender moored behind. A second half page engraving beautifully details the Sandy Hook Light Vessel on station, tossing in the sea with a yacht crossing its bow. Nice detail showing both masts with day recognition signals and deck structures. Includes copy of accompanying article describing the use of lightships and buoys and the work of the Lighthouse service. Wonderful piece. Unusually clean, light toning, great for display. (VG).  $38 net.

6587c,d. THE SANDY HOOK LIGHT-SHIP. Harper’s Weekly. September 27, 1879 . 7” x 9½”. Drawn by F. S. Cozzens. Fine close, detailed half-page woodcut engraving of the Sandy Hook Light Vessel on station, tossing in the sea,  with a yacht crossing its bow. Nice detail showing both masts with day recognition signals and deck structures. Unusually clean, in as nice a condition as I have yet found, beautiful for display. Near fine, full issue. (F-). $54.

8188b. OIL ENGINE SIGNALING PLANT ON UNITED STATES LIGHTSHIP NO 42 [Great Round Shoal]. Scientific American. July 4, 1896. Full issue. Lengthy 1 1/2 page article includes lengthy article with description with specifications for new fog signaling system powered by the new oil engine, thus saving the time formerly needed to build up steam. Includes a striking illustration with cross sectional view showing distribution of machinery, and a view of the lightship at anchor. Quite interesting, scarce article. Clean, sewn holes on left margin from binding, a good copy. (VG-).$38 net.

 

29200. na. Cornfield Point Light Vessel LV-51 – A Connecticut State Archaeological Preserve. Published for the Connecticut State Historical Preservation Office by Historical Perspectives, Inc. c.2006. 24p. Soft wraps. Quite a nice publication, Details the history of Light Vessel No. 51 including her recent discovery in Long Island Sound off Old Saybrook. After serving for 27 years, on April 14, 1919 she was rammed by an oil barge and sank within eight minutes. The crew disembarked to the lifeboat and were picked up by a tug. Booklet includes chapters on lightship history, design and technology, LV No. 51, Life on board, Reminiscences of a retired light vessel crewman, Sister ships, The sinking of light vessel No. 51, Underwater survey of the wreck, and more. Thoroughly illustrated. Well done. (M). $12.95.

25242. (photo) U.S. Lightship No. 78 at depot wharf c.1910. Lightship No. 78 was a steam screw; steel hull; 2 steel masts with wood spencers; stack amidships; small wheelhouse ahead of foremast vessel built in 1904. Great view shows her with another light vessel along side at the depot wharf. Clear view measures 3 ½” x 5 ½” on postcard paper, dating from 1904-1920 based on stamp box. Light soiling to back, few small stains, written note on back, not postmarked. (VG). $32.

C29206. na. Stonehorse Lightship (WAL-524) Plan & Photo Feature. Model Ship Journal. Vol. 1, No. 2. Winter 2000-2001. pp. 42-47. Great article for the lightship modeler or enthusiast includes specifications and a bit of her history, as well as a number of plans and profiles and detailed photographs. (Photocopy $2). 

28322. (broadside) NOTICE TO MARINERS. NEW LIGHT-VESSEL OFF NORTHEAST END OF FIVE FATHOM BANK – NEW JERSEY. Office of the Light-House Board. Wash. DC. March 24, 1882. Scarce early broadside notes that: “Notice is hereby given that, on or about June 1, 1882, a Light-ship will be moored off the coast of New Jersey, near the northeast end of Five-Fathom Bank, at the position now occupied by the whistling-buoy, in 9 fathoms of water. The vessel is schooner-rigged and painted red, with the words "NORTHEAST END" on each side in large black letters, and "No. 44" on the stern. A fixed red light will be shown from the foremast-head, at about 40 feet from the level of the sea, and a fixed white light from the mainmast-head, at about the same height. ­They should be visible in clear weather about eleven nautical miles. At each mast­head there will be displayed cage-work DAY-MARKS painted BLACK and sur­mounted by black balls…. “ This station marked the northeast end of Five Fathom Bank and served as a reference for coastwise traffic. The station remained in service from 1882 until 1932, when it was replaced by a lighted whistle buoy. This early broadside measures 8 ¼” x 13” There is some age toning and a bit of soiling on the folds, some wear to edges, two short 1” edge tears. Will be most attractive for when matted and framed. (VG-). $225. 

26288. (photo) Lightship No. 513 (WLV-612) Nantucket c.2002. Color photo taken in 2002 shows the Nantucket Lightship No. 513 moored in New Bedford Harbor. 8” x 10” matted, ready for framing. (F-). $22.

 

 

21509 J. na. U. S. LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE. Fortune Magazine January 1937. Pp. 61-69, 126-132. Lengthy, large folio illustrated article details the men and equipment of today’s Lighthouse Service. Wonderfully illustrated with photographs, paintings and diagrams including a large full page diagram of the Nantucket LV No. 112  illustrating its construction, equipment and operation. Other photos include quartermaster at the wheel of the Lighthouse Tender Spruce, lens apparatus, buoys and more. Most interesting and detailed article. Full issue. (VG+).  $54.

28447. na. Blind Man’s Buff. Popular Mechanics. c.1939. 7p. Unusually good article, chock full of photographs, details the work and stations of the Lighthouse Service in aiding mariners traveling the dangerous routes from New York to Nantucket Shoals in the incessant fog. Good detail of the systems in place including submarine signaling, radio direction finding and more. Filled with over 14 illustrations. Disbound. (VG). $28.

24363. (photo collection ) Ambrose Lightship WLV-613. Collection of four official US Coast Guard photographs and newspaper article show the Ambrose on station, crew photograph of her last crew, construction of her replacement tower and a completed view of the Ambrose tower. Also included is a 1967 page from the Staten Island Advance newspaper detailing the construction process. Close, clear b/w 8” x 10” views. (VG+). $68.

2657. na. ABOARD THE FIVE-FATHOM LIGHTSHIP. Popular Mechanics. c.1930. 5p. “More happens during a twenty-four hour watch on the Five-Fathom lightship anchored thirty miles out in the Atlantic ocean, than in many a high-powered factory, running full blast, back on terra firma. There is work – plenty of it – every moment.” Complete article details the life and work aboard the vessel. Well illustrated with numerous early photos of the men and equipment. Well done. Disbound. (VG).  $56.

23528. (set 2 photos) Sandy Hook Light Vessel No. 16. c. 189 0. Light Vessel No. 16 was constructed in 1854 at  Somerset , Mass for the cost of $22,000. She was built of white oak; copper & iron fastened; with bowsprit; and 2 masts with oval daymarks at both mastheads. Her illuminating apparatus consisted of 2 lanterns, each having 8 oil lamps & reflectors. From 1854-1891 she was assigned to  Sandy Hook station in  New York . In August of 1892 she was  equipped with English revolving (flashing) apparatus rotated by two small steam winch engines, also fitted with boiler and steam fog whistle. There appears to be no steam engine on board in these photos, thus dating them to prior to 1892. Albumen photos are close and clear, but have deteriorated some by foxing over the years, one somewhat dark, ½” tear to edge on one.  Still, these are exceptionally rare views of the vessel docked at the depot. (G+). $155 net.  

  

22199. Nantucket Light Vessel LV-112 Model by Bluejacket Ship Crafters. BlueJacket Ship Crafters has been recognized as one of the premier model manufacturers and builders since their opening in 1905. Continuing in this fine tradition, they have produced this 19”,  1/8” scale model of the famous Nantucket Light Vessel No. 112. Before the era of modern aids to navigation, lightships played a crucial role and none more than those on the dreaded Nantucket Shoals. This area of the coastline boasted more light vessels over the years than any other coastline in the world. The ‘112 was built in 1936 following a collision with her predecessor LV-117 in 1934 by the British liner SS Olympic. This model shows her as launched, with a tall stack for her steam boiler, steel pilot house and two masts with 500mm lanterns and lantern galleries. Complete kit includes pre-carved basswood hull, finely cast Britannia pewter and photo-etched brass fittings, all wood, styrene, and other high quality materials needed to complete this dramatic and colorful model. With detailed plans and a 33- page instruction booklet with drawings and color photos. build this great model ship. Scale 1/8"=1', Length 18 1/2", Beam 3 3/4", Height 12". This model will add grace and charm to any office, den or family room and will become a valuable heirloom in years to come. Kit only $289.

  

957nnn. (lightship model kit) Nantucket Lightship No. 112. WAL 534. Finally Liondberg has retooled and begun to offer this sought after model kit of the Nantucket Lightship No. 112.  This kit #70860, copyright 2007, is a 1/95 scale replica, 17 ¼” long, still manufactured in the USA, and one of only a few ever designed of a U. S. light vessel It is also fairly close to HO railroading scale of 1/87. It had its origins as the Pyro kit of the same subject in the late 50s. Lindberg bought the molds and produced the kit for a few years and then ceased production for many years. It has been sought after for many years since going out of production in the late 1980’s, and now they have brought it back. This is complete and unassembled, in new condition and factory sealed,  and is a perfect way to spend the cold days remaining of winter. This is an exceptional find for you lightship enthusiasts. For those of you who would prefer the original Pyro or Lindberg model, we have those available as well. Unassembled kit. (M). $58 net.

     

957  [lightship model] Nantucket Lightship No. 112. WAL 534. Again we have found this sought after model of the Nantucket Lightship No. 112, by Lindberg Classic Replicas. This kit #717, copyright 1986, is a 1/95 scale replica and one of only a few ever designed of a U. S. light vessel It is also fairly close to HO railroading scale of 1/87. It likely had its origins as the Pyro and Frog kit of the same subject in the late 50s. Lindberg bought the molds and produced the kit for a few years. It has been sought after for many years since going out of production in the late 1980’s. This is complete and un-built, new old stock and is a perfect way to spend the cold days remaining of winter. This is an exceptional find for you lightship enthusiasts as very few were produced and still fewer have survived. (VG+). $78. Sale Price $66.

  

957-12. [early lightship model] Nantucket Lightship No. 112. WAL 534. Rarely do we find this earliest version of this sought after model of the Nantucket Lightship No. 112, by Pyro Plastics Corp. No. 238. c.1960’s. This replica is one of only a few ever designed of a U. S. light vessel and has been sought after for many years since going out of production in the 1970’s. This is a 17” (1/95th scale) model kit and is complete in unbuilt condition and is a perfect way to spend the cold days remaining of winter. This early version is an exceptional find for you lightship enthusiasts as very few were produced and still fewer have survived. Have had only two other of this version in 20 years. (VG+). $88.

  

Also similar earlier model by Pyro available $88.

Commemorative Coast Guard, Lighthouse and Lightship Covers

Commemorative envelopes, each addressed and stamped and postmarked on the commissioning day and first day on station, or from Officer in Charge, and with the return address of the light station or vessel commanding officer. Covers clean, crisp, and are important Coast Guard and light vessel collector’s items:

22361j. USCG Lightship Nantucket 2 WLV 613, Commanding Officer. Postmarked April 19, 1980. $22

22361k. USCG Lightship Relief WLV 613, Commanding Officer. Postmarked April 28, 1979. $22

Others available

21158. [Limited edition print] First Light [ NANTUCKET LIGHTSHIP] by Art Pressman. Fine limited edition color print was created from an original watercolor painting by Nantucket artist Art Pressman. The large print is signed and numbered of 500 copies by the artist and is printed on heavy card stock ready for framing. The print depicts the Nantucket Light Vessel No. 112 on station, where its mournful fog horn and light marked the treacherous Nantucket Shoals. This bright colorful print measures 19” x 24” including a 2 ½” border and shows a detailed view of the port side of the vessel. Mr. Pressman has been painting maritime subjects since the early 1970’s, with his work appearing in museums across the country. This would be a beautiful addition for the lighthouse and lightship enthusiast. Shipped rolled. Numbers available: #67, 68, 69, 73, 77, 237, 238. (VG). $78.

23117. [Light-House Service] SPECIFICATIONS FOR THE SINGLE-SCREW, STEEL, DIESEL-PROPELLED SECOND-CLASS LIGHTSHIP “No. 118”. Wash. 1936. 96 p. Complete specifications for the construction of the Second Class Light-Vessel No. 118. Specifications detail all manner of construction and equipment of this beautiful vessels, from keel and frame, masts, lights, pumps, lantern houses, day marks, boats, ballast, sails, painting and more. LV -118 Was constructed in 1936 by Rice Brothers in East Boothbay, Maine for a cost of $223,900. She served on Cornfield Point from 1938 to 1957, Cross Rip from 1958 to 1962, and on Boston from 1962 until 1972 when she was retired. Presently she is on display in Lewes , Delaware and marked “Overfalls”, though she was never assigned to that station. Excellent for research, most interesting reading.  (Spiral bound facsimile. $21)

   2694. Bradford, Gershom. THE LIGHTSHIP – She Furnishes to the Mariner a Definitely Marked Position…. Motor Boat Magazine. January 10, 1926. 3p. (disbound). Excellent article, illustrated with four period photos, details current lightship operations, life on board, mooring and more. Nice piece, good too for framing. (VG).  $48.

25344. Claflin, James W. HISTORIC NANTUCKET LIGHTSHIPS: NEW SOUTH SHOAL 1854-1896 - A History of Nantucket ’s Lightships on New South Shoal. Volume I. Worcester . 2005. 68 p. Soft wraps. Historic Nantucket Lightships: New South Shoal 1854-1896 is one of a continuing series of booklets that tell the story of historic lighthouses, lightships and life-saving stations along the New England Coast . Nantucket Sound and Davis ’s New South Shoals have long been one of the most dangerous areas along the New England coast. By 1908 twelve light-vessels stood guard over this area southeast of Nantucket , more than any other comparable area in the world. With thousands of vessels plying the dangerous waters, the chance of a shipping disaster was always great. Hundreds of shipwrecks did indeed occur off the coast with startling losses. Using descriptive text and a variety of vintage images from private as well as museum collections, we get a rare glimpse into the history of the area and the lives of these dedicated government men and women. Author James Claflin combines an extensively researched text with his exquisite collection of vintage photographs, many previously unpublished, to tell the story of this important piece of history. (M). $8.95.

25230. MacAlindin, Bob. PRISONERS OF THE SEA. Milford Haven. 1999. 176 p. Soft wraps. The crews and the lightships that they manned were the prisoners of an alien environment. For the men it was, in the main, a voluntary exile, that was marginally better for a seaman than voyaging the seven seas and being away from their families for years. For the ships, anchored in one place at the mercy of the buffeting sea, it was a trail between their builder and nature. In spite of this the prisoners enjoyed sunny afternoons fishing and yarning, but were always ready, whatever the weather, to risk their lives to rescue less fortunate seamen whose ships had tried to impale themselves on the very mark that the light vessel was guarding them against. The author traces the development of these "prisons" from the early almost un-seaworthy wooden hulks to the modern well founded, all steel, high-tech light vessel, and includes many stories from the crews´ point of view. (M).              $29.95.

4158. [photograph] U. S. Lightship No. 51, Cornfield Point Light Vessel c.1892-1894. This wonderful period photo measures 10” x 14 and shows the vessel moored at the Light-House Depot. Great detail shows the masts, all rigging and extensive details of the deck houses and equipment. View is exceptionally close and crystal clear.  Photo has been archivally matted and professionally framed to 15” x 19”. Certainly a distinctive piece. As you can expect, such large lightship photos are extremely rare and command superior prices, making this a wonderful opportunity. (F-). $368.

2452. (photo print) Ambrose Lightship WLV 533 and Tower. c.1967. The Ambrose lightship station was established in 1908 when the Sandy Hook lightship was moved to a new location 8 miles east of Rockaway Point N.Y. and renamed Ambrose lightship. In Aug. 1952 a new lightship WLV 613 replaced the WAL 533. It remained on Ambrose station until Aug. 23 1967, when it was replaced with a $2.5 million Texas tower. This dramatic full color photo view shows WAL 533 underway passing its replacement tower. This is a large, framed, 14” x 18” full color printed view from a photograph. A bright,  interesting addition for your wall. (VG+). $58 net.

24283. H. R. Rep. No. 672. INJURIES INCURRED MOORING LIGHT-SHIP OFF SANDY HOOK. April 30, 1842. 2p. Interesting report on severe injuries suffered in mooring the light-ship off Sandy Hook and making a claim for compensation. $14.

9377. H. R. Report No. 3628. LIGHT-SHIP WITH A FOG-SIGNAL AT SANDY HOOK. December 19, 1888. 1p. Short reports the passage of a bill to establish a light-vessel off Sandy Hook, but notes that said bill failed to become law because it reached the President to late for his signature. $10.

Lighthouse & Lightship Trade Cards

Beautiful multi colored trade cards c. 1880’s showing a very nice, close, multi colored images of lighthouses, light-vessels or buoys. These fantastic cards were issued by the Duke Tobacco Co. as an insert premium in their brands of HONEST LONG CUT  and G. W. GAIL & AX’S Tobacco and Cigarettes during 1889. These cards are from a fairly rare series of 25 cards entitled , " LIGHTHOUSES", and are designated as N119 in Burdick’s American Card Catalogue. The front of each card features a colorful die cut image of a particular lighthouse, light-vessel or buoy, while the back features advertising for Duke Tobacco. The lithography for the cards is exceptional, full of vibrant color and detail and was done by the Giles Co of New York . Labeled “Smoke and Chew Honest Long Cut Tobacco” or G. W. Gail & Ax’s Navy on the obverse. Trade cards were used as are our present day advertising or business cards. Nice images, die cut to shape of lighthouse, vessel or buoy. Each approx. 4”w x 2½”h. A very pretty set to collect and display. Extremely difficult to find and a most valuable collector’s item.

   

#605 

ww. Sandy Hook Lightship. (VG+). $78.

uu. Brenton’s Reef Lightship. (Fine). $78.

yy. Vineyard Sound Lightship. (fine). $78.

qq. Minot’s Ledge Lighthouse. (VG). $58.

oo. Fire Island Lighthouse. (Fine). $68.

mm. Stratford Shoal Lighthouse. Two folds to base. (VG). $38.

LL. Sanibel Island Lighthouse, Florida . (Fine). $68.

c3. Bell Buoy. (VG+). $54.

nn. Bell Buoy. One fold. (G). $34.  

4268. (na) POLICEMEN OF THE SEA. 16pp. Harpers New Monthly Magazine. Vol. 38. March 1869. Article looks at the work of the Light-House, Life-Saving and Revenue Cutter services as well as wreckers and more. Nicely illustrated with 15 very nice early engravings including Sandy Hook light-ship, Neversink Lights, early lifeboat station, station house at Barnegat, life-car in action, wreckers, Revenue Cutter on patrol, and more. (disbound)  $10.

5270p. Talbot, Frederick A.,  LIGHTSHIPS AND LIGHTHOUSES. London . 1913. 325pp. Well illustrated with over 110 photographic plates, many quite unusual and interesting. Details lighthouses throughout the world. Extremely interesting and detailed, one of the more sought after texts on the subject. Subjects include lighthouse origins, building a lighthouse, light and illuminants, fog signals, the Eddystone Lighthouse, some famous lights of England, lighthouses built on sand, light patrols of the French coast, Minot’s Ledge Light, guardian lights of Canada’s coast, lamp-posts of the Great lakes, electric lighthouses, floating lights, the light-keeper and his life, and much more. Includes an additional 60 plates, newspaper clippings and floral plates that have been nicely added by a previous owner to supplement the book. Clean, crisp, tight, unusually bright copy with very little wear. Nice copy of a scarce, important work. (VG+) $179 net.

22379. [newspaper] Proposals for Light-House on Robbin’s Reef in the Harbor of New York, and second Proposal for Building a Vessel to be used as a Floating Light [lightship] off Sandy Hook . The New York Times. August 25, 1837 .  Lengthy 1/4th page articles detail specifications for the above lighthouse and light vessel in the New York area. Detailed information includes all aspects of the construction, dimensions and materials to be used, lanterns and equipment. Extremely detailed, interesting very early information on these two important lights. (Photocopy $1).

  

27301. Rongner, George E. LIFE ABOARD A COAST GUARD LIGHTSHIP. Infinity Publishing. 2007. 247p. Soft wraps. George E. Rongner served 32 years in the U. S. Coast Guard, enlisting as a surfman and rising to Chief Warrant Officer. One of his many assignments included ass Officer in Charge, Buzzards Bay Lightship. His readable account chronicles the ceaseless dangers and constant tedium experienced by the men living closely together at sea for such lengthy periods of time. He describes as no outsider can, how they reacted to the routine, the piercing emanations of the fog signal, and the perils from storms and passing vessels. Former lightship sailor and anyone interested in the sea, will enjoy this look into the everyday life aboard a Coast Guard Lightship. Nicely done, a great read. (M). $14.95.

27296. Kirklin, Wayne. LIGHTSHIPS: Floating Lighthouses Of The Mid-Atlantic. History Press. 2007. 128p. Before radar, depth finders and satellite-guided navigation—before the seafloor was charted with scientific precision—mariners had to rely on alternative means to approach a coastline safely. Lightships played an invaluable role in filling the void. In Lightships, author Wayne Kirklin chronicles the heyday of these crucial navigational aids. (M). $19.99.

C2346. U.S. Light-House Establishment. PLANS U. S. LIGHT VESSEL NO. 50. c.1899. Full size photocopies of original architectural drawings for the U. S. Light Vessel No. 50. This rare set is comprised of two (2) large 31” x 22” architectural drawings. Drawings include full Starboard Outboard Profiles View, Deck plan, bow/stern view, line view, centerline profile and more. Light Vessel No. 50 was launched in 1892 and served on the Columbia River Station from 1892-1909 and at a number of other California stations and as Relief. This is a most interesting and rare document, which gives an unprecedented look at the construction of this type of Light Vessel. Photocopy set of 2 sheets. (shipped rolled). $28.

C22436. U.S. Light-House Establishment. PLANS U. S. LIGHT VESSEL NO. 83. c.1903. Full size photocopies of original architectural drawings for the U. S. Light Vessel No. 83. This rare set is comprised of five (5) large 48” x 27” architectural drawings. Drawings include full Outboard Profiles View, Deck plans, Pilot House plan, seven sectional views, and Hull Plan. Light Vessel No. 83 was launched in 1904 and served on a number of California stations and as Relief. This is a most interesting and rare document, which gives an unprecedented look at the construction of this type of Light Vessel. Complete photocopy set of 5 sheets. (shipped rolled) $34.

C23107. U.S. Light-House Establishment. PLANS U. S. LIGHT VESSEL NO. 80 COLUMBIA .. c.1909. Full size photocopies of redrawn plans for the U. S. Light Vessel No. 80 that served off the Columbia River Entrance. This rare set is comprised of three (3) large 30” x 20” architectural drawings, probably redrawn from the originals for use by model makers in 1969.  . Drawings include the vessel as she appeared in 1909 including full Starboard Outboard Profile View, Spar Deck plan, views of pilot house, lantern houses, profile view, aft profile view. Also includes series of views as she appeared at decommissioning in 1961. Light Vessel No. 88 was launched in 1907 and served on the Columbia River Station from 1909-1939 and at a number of other California stations and as Relief. This is a most interesting and rare document, which gives an unprecedented look at the construction of this type of Light Vessel. Photocopy set of 3 sheets. (shipped rolled). $32.

C22441. U.S. Light-House Establishment. PLANS U. S. LIGHT VESSEL WAL-605. c.1960’s. Full size photocopies of original architectural drawings for the U. S. Light Vessel WAL-605. This rare set is comprised of five (5) large 48” x 27” architectural drawings. Drawings include Outboard Profiles View, Deck plans, sectional views, hull plan. This is a most interesting and rare document, which gives an unprecedented look at the construction of this type of Light Vessel. Complete photocopy set of 5 sheets. (shipped rolled) $34.

C22191. na. THE AMBROSE CHANNEL LIGHTSHIP – New Vessel Takes the Place of the Familiar Old Sandy Hook Lightship…. Fall River Line Journal. May 3, 1909. Two page article describes the new Ambrose Channel Light Vessel No. 87 which recently replaced the crimson-colored Sandy Hook No. 51. Article describes a bit about the area and the vessels that have served there over the years as well as the new replacement vessel and her crew.  (Photocopy $1).

C22440. U.S. Light-House Establishment. PLANS U. S. LIGHT VESSEL No. 113, WAL-535. c.1940’s. [redrawn] Full size photocopies of original architectural drawings for the U. S. Light Vessel WAL-605. This rare set is comprised of six (6) large 48” x 27” architectural drawings. Drawings include Deck plans, sectional views, bow to stern sectional view, Outboard Profiles View, and hull plan. Light Vessel No. 113 was built in 1929 and served on stations in the Washington and Alaska area. This is a most interesting and rare document, which gives an unprecedented look at the construction of this type of Light Vessel. Complete photocopy set of 6 sheets. (shipped rolled) $36.

C8284. Ridgely-Nevitt, Cedric. A LIGHT-VESSEL OF 1823 BUILT BY HENRY ECKFORD. [The American Neptune . Vol. V. No. 2. April 1945]. 5p. In the 1820’s Henry Eckford entered into an agreement to provide three vessels to the United States to be used as floating lights. These vessels were to be 72 feet in length and 300 tons burthen, have two masts for raising lanterns of 3 foot square, and 450 pound bell with belfry. This rare, detailed description includes sectional and plan views. (Photocopy $1).

C20189. H. R. Report No. 157. LIGHT VESSEL NEAR ORFORD REEF, OREGON . December 18, 1903. 2p. Reports on the need for a light vessel off Cape Blanco and requests an appropriation of $120,000 for said vessel. Includes a description of the proposed station and the area. (Photocopy $1).

C7226. H. R. Doc. No. 602. NEW LIGHT VESSEL FOR THE FIFTH LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. April 14, 1900. 2p. Request to Congress for an appropriation to replace the L. H. Tender Bramble due to its age and disrepair. Although the titles state ‘light vessel’, it appears that the use will be as a tender. (Photocopy $1)

C23107. U.S. Light-House Establishment. PLANS U. S. LIGHT VESSEL NO. 80 COLUMBIA .. c.1909. Full size photocopies of redrawn plans for the U. S. Light Vessel No. 80 that served off the Columbia River Entrance. This rare set is comprised of three (3) large 30” x 20” architectural drawings, probably redrawn from the originals for use by model makers in 1969.  . Drawings include the vessel as she appeared in 1909 including full Starboard Outboard Profile View, Spar Deck plan, views of pilot house, lantern houses, profile view, aft profile view. Also includes series of views as she appeared at decommissioning in 1961. Light Vessel No. 88 was launched in 1907 and served on the Columbia River Station from 1909-1939 and at a number of other California stations and as Relief. This is a most interesting and rare document, which gives an unprecedented look at the construction of this type of Light Vessel. Photocopy set of 3 sheets. (shipped rolled). $32.

C2084. H. R. Doc. No. 32. LETTER FROM THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY COMMUNICATING INFORMATION IN RELATION TO THE REMOVAL OF THE LIGHT VESSEL FROM BRANDYWINE SHOAL TO TUCKERNUCK SHOAL. January 12, 1828 . 7p. Very early reply from the Secretary of the Treasury to the House if Representatives informing them that the light vessel has not been removed from Brandywine Shoal. It was the intention to remove the vessel when the lighthouse being built at that location was completed. However, in November of 1827 a storm arose, causing such damage to the lighthouse that it could not be lit, and thus the need for the vessel. Includes quite a bit of information on the construction and condition of the early lighthouse at this location. (Photocopy $1.40.)

C23111. [newspaper] OLD SANDY HOOK LIGHTSHIP TO GO. New York Herald. October 28, 1908. Lengthy 9” column article notes that a new vessel will occupy the Ambrose Channel 87 station in place of the Sandy Hook station effective December 1st. Article gives details of the new vessel, as well as the reasoning behind the establishment of the new station. (Photocopy $1).

C2694. Bradford, Gershom. THE LIGHTSHIP – She Furnishes to the Mariner a Definitely Marked Position…. Motor Boat Magazine. January 10, 1926. 3p. Excellent article, illustrated with four period photos, details current lightship operations, life on board, mooring and more. Nice piece. (Photocopy $2).

C26136. End of [Lightship] No. 117. Time Magazine. Mar 28, 1934. Lightship No. 117 was built in 1930 at Charleston , SC. And was lost at sea on May 15, 1934 when it was rammed and sunk by the RMS Olympic, the sister vessel to RMS Titanic. Seven men were killed instantly when Olympic struck. The light ship had been rammed already that year in the fog, and the following month the Olympic actually collided with LV-117 and sent it to the bottom in seconds. Four crewmen went down with the ship while the Olympic rescued the remaining seven crewmen. Three of these men would later die from injuries and exposure. The British Government paid for the construction of a new lightship, the ‘112 as reparation for the accident. Half page article reports on the details of the  incident including background information as well as testimony from the Olympic’s crew. Filled with other interesting pre-war articles and advertisements of the day. (Photocopy $1).

C25234. Cram, Hal. CHRISTMAS SPIRIT SURROUNDS THE LIGHTSHIP. Sun Up – Maine ’s Own Magazine. December 1925. Lengthy 1 ½ page article interviews the officers and men aboard the Portland Lightship No. 75. Includes a great deal of information on their life on board that we don’t normally find, such as the men who are hired on by the captain, watches, leaves and much more. Good information, with one small photo of the vessel. (Photocopy $1).

C25157. Mont , A. R., A LIGHTSHIP MAKES A UNIQUE MODEL. Model Craftsman Magazine. January 1937. 5p. Early modeler’s magazine presents four full page builder’s plans for a U.S. Government lightship, along with a page of description and instructions by the author. A great reference for the advanced modeler.  (Photocopy $2).

C22379. [newspaper] Proposals for Light-House on Robbin’s Reef in the Harbor of New York , and second Proposal for Building a Vessel to be used as a Floating Light [lightship] off Sandy Hook . The New York Times. August 25, 1837 .  Lengthy 1/4th page articles detail specifications for the above lighthouse and light vessel in the New York area. Detailed information includes all aspects of the construction, dimensions and materials to be used, lanterns and equipment. Extremely detailed, interesting very early information on these two important lights. (Photocopy $1).

C22191. na. THE AMBROSE CHANNEL LIGHTSHIP – New Vessel Takes the Place of the Familiar Old Sandy Hook Lightship…. Fall River Line Journal. May 3, 1909. Two page article describes the new Ambrose Channel Light Vessel No. 87 which recently replaced the crimson-colored Sandy Hook No. 51. Article describes a bit about the area and the vessels that have served there over the years as well as the new replacement vessel and her crew.  (Photocopy $1).

C7197kkk. [newspaper] LIGHTSHIP CREW’S PERILOUS VOYAGE – Forced to Bail From Ram Island Light to Port to Prevent Sinking. Portland Evening Express & Advertiser. January 11, 1910. Article notes that five members of the crew started out toward the Cape Elizabeth lightship in the vessel’s new motor boat and made good time until off Ram Island Light, when suddenly the boat began to leak about the stern post. The water ran in so fast that three of the men were forced to bail continuously while the remaining two furiously kept the water from the engine. After finally reaching the pier in Portland , a tug was chartered and a new start was made for the lightship. The crew had been ashore and were in route to relieve the crew now on board. Most interesting reading. (Photocopy $1).

C98337. Light-House Board. DESCRIPTION OF THE UNITED STATES LIGHT-VESSEL NO. 85 [ NANTUCKET SHOALS], AND FIXTURES, WITH LIST OF OUTFITS ON BOARD, STATIONED IN THE SECOND LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. GPO. 1912. 35p. Lighthouse Service Vessel Description form filled out for Nantucket Shoals Lightship #85. Complete information on all aspects of the vessel, its design and equipment on board from engine, life rafts, berths, to radios and illuminating apparatus. Portion of proceeds to be donated to Shore Village Museum .  (Spiral bound photocopy $7).

C21290. Cook, George Crouse. THE EVOLUTION OF THE LIGHTSHIP. Transactions of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers. Volume XXI. New York . 1913. Pp.97-118 with additional 10 large fold-out plans and full page photo plate. Quite interesting and detailed article discusses progress made in the design of light vessels around the world, with particular emphasis put on US Light Vessel No. 94 on Frying Pan Shoals in an effort to show the present state of lightship development. Includes design considerations in British and French light vessels through the 1800’s, then discussions on the progress made in this country in the 19th century. Includes lengthy discussions on the evolution hull design in an effort to reduce the rolling, but also discusses propelling machinery, lighting apparatus and more. Of particular interest are the large fold-out plans detailing every aspect of on US Light Vessel No. 94 on Frying Pan Shoals. In addition to a large photo, plan sheets include hull line views, displacement curves, sectional views, large deck plan views, views of lantern, mast and lighting apparatus, sectional and elevation views of main engine, sectional and elevation views of boiler and steam equipment, and more. Plans range in size from 10” x 13” to 17” x 25”. An interesting and detailed contribution to a little known subject. (photocopy $34.)

C98336. Lighthouse Service. DESCRIPTION OF LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE VESSEL, FORM 40. FIRE ISLAND LIGHTSHIP #114, 3RD LIGHTHOUSE DISTRICT. GPO. 1930. 16p. Lighthouse Service Vessel Description form filled out for Fire Island Lightship #114. Complete information on all aspects of the vessel, its design and equipment on board from engine, life rafts, berths, to radios and illuminating apparatus. (Photocopy $3.20).

C23117. [Light-House Service] SPECIFICATIONS FOR THE SINGLE-SCREW, STEEL, DIESEL-PROPELLED SECOND-CLASS LIGHTSHIP “No. 118”. Wash. 1936. 96 p. Complete specifications for the construction of the Second Class Light-Vessel No. 118. Specifications detail all manner of construction and equipment of this beautiful vessels, from keel and frame, masts, lights, pumps, lantern houses, day marks, boats, ballast, sails, painting and more. LV -118 Was constructed in 1936 by Rice Brothers in East Boothbay, Maine for a cost of $223,900. She served on Cornfield Point from 1938 to 1957, Cross Rip from 1958 to 1962, and on Boston from 1962 until 1972 when she was retired. Presently she is on display in Lewes, Delawars and marked “Overfalls”, though she was never assigned to that station. Excellent for research, most interesting reading.  (Spiral bound facsimile. $21)

C22316. Anthony, Richard H., NANTUCKET LIGHTSHIP – This Offshore Guardian of Our Coast Is the World’s Most Exposed Lightvessel. Yachting Magazine. August 1937. Pp. 80-84. Excellent article chronicles the life of the crew aboard this famous beacon. With 6 close interior and exterior views including a great view of the brass lighthouse bow insignia on the tender Anemone. (Photocopy $2).

C23110. Stokes, Ted. ESCAPE BY LAND LIGHTSHIP NO. 50.  Oregon Historical Quarterly. December 1968. Pp. 306-323. Light Vessel No. 50 was launched in 1892 and served on the Columbia River Station from 1892-1909 and at a number of other California stations and as Relief. Late in 1899 after a howling gale her anchor chain parted and she was driven ashore on the western face of Cape Disappointment . Tugs and the Lighthouse Tender Manzanita hurried to her aid but they were unable to keep her from the beach. All during December 1899 she lay on her side  in the pounding winter surf. Finally a plan was devised to pull her overland to Baker’s Bay. This is the remarkable story of the efforts to pull her overland and re-float her. Well illustrated with vintage photos. (Photocopy $3.80).

C23161. White, Richard D. Jr., WHEN LIGHTSHIPS WATCHED OVER VIRGINIA WATERS. Virginia Cavalcade. Summer 1980. Pp. 38-47. Excellent detailed article traces the history of lightships and their use in Virginia waters. Beginning in 1732 with two lanterns hanging from a sloop’s mast, the vessels progressed over the years. Article details the evolution of these vessels and the lives of the crews on board. Nicely illustrated with 13 vintage photographs. (Photocopy $2).

C8498. Johnson, Robert. HARD TIMES ON THE FIRST SOUTH SHOALS LIGHT VESSEL. pp.23-29 [Historical Nantucket by Nantucket Historical Association. Volume 31, No. 2. October 1983]. In this chapter of the author’s unpublished manuscript, Mr. Johnson details the hardships endured by the crew o f the Nantucket South Shoal Light Vessel during the 1850’s. During the crew’s first winter on station,  supplies became depleted over the months and with no other vessels coming into view the crew was forced set out in their 16-foot gig to procure food, water, fuel, wicks and other supplies needed. A good account of the crew’s hardships and the work required. (Photocopy $1.20).

C2224. Sibley, John. LIFE ABOARD THE AMBROSE LIGHTSHIP. Ships and the Sea Magazine. November 1952. Lengthy six page article visits the crew of the newly launched Ambrose Lightship 25 miles off Manhattan . The author offers in great detail a glimpse of the day to day routine of the ship’s crew, the hazards and the jobs that they perform. Certainly one of the more detailed accounts of life aboard these vessels. Well illustrated with six large photographs. (Photocopy $2).

28330. (lot paper) Savannah Lightship No. 94 c.1944. Great lot of six (6) items that were the property of a gentleman who served in the Coast Guard as a Radioman 2c on the Savannah Lightship during World War II. Lot includes: (1) List of crew members of the Savannah Lightship dated August - October 1944, listing the names of the 23 crew members. On letter Form 2614A - Revised Oct. 1933 TREASURY DEPARTMENT U.S. Coast Guard. (2) Radio Log Savannah Lightship #94 - Re: Hurricane 15 October, 1944. This piece of paper is hand-typed letterhead, detailing weather advisory to all Coast Guard vessels from radio station NMV at  Jacksonville Beach, Florida. (3) Telegraphy Lesson No. 1. This hand-typed piece of paper (front & back) provides some of the drill exercises needed to teach the Radioman student the names of the different letters and numerals & to show how they are transmitted in the INTERNATIONAL MORSE TELEGRAPH CODE and give him a receiving speed of 5 words per minute. (4) 4.) Assignment Questions - Institute Course for Radioman 2c: This 27-page paperback booklet was provided by the U.S. Coast Guard Institute Groton, Connecticut, for the preparation for Radioman 2c. (5) 5.) Instructions (RE: Form 1-A) - WWII Veterans' Compensation: This sheet of paper is the instructions which accompanied the form - WWII Veterans' Compensation Bureau, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. (6) Continuance of National Service Life Insurance (Oct. 1945): This 41-page paperback booklet contains information about the continuance of Life Insurance for the Veterans of WWII from the Veterans' Administration. Interesting lot. (VG). $28.

28347. Fraser, Robert. The First Lightship… and the Last. Motor Boating Magazine. September 1962. Two page article describes the Brenton Reef lightship and life on board as she was destined to be replaced by the new Brenton Light Tower. Includes some history of the use of light vessels in America, details of the new tower and more. (VG). $18.

Rare Group of Lightship Blueprints from 1920’s and 1930’s, Lightships Nos. 73 & 90:

Lightship #73 served on Pollock Rip Shoals and Vineyard Sound from 1902-1944, when she was lost with all hands during a hurricane.

Lightship #90 served in the First and Second Districts from 1908 – 1952.

28287a. (blueprint) United States Lighthouse Service. Lantern Gallery for Masthead. Light vessels No. #73, #90. Office of the Superintendent of Lighthouses 3rd District Staten Island (1 of 1) June 11, 1924. 22” x 30”. Original blueprint includes separate views of complete lantern gallery for masthead for both light vessel No. 73 and No. 90, as well as five details. Scale 1 ½” = 1’. Clean, rolled, but some wear and tears to original folds. (G+). $100.

28287b. (blueprint) United States Lighthouse Service. Lantern Gallery for Masthead. Light vessels No. #73, #90. Office of the Superintendent of Lighthouses 3rd District Staten Island (1 of 1) June 11, 1924. 22” x 30”. Original blueprint includes separate views of complete lantern gallery for masthead for both light vessel No. 73 and No. 90, as well as five details. Scale 1 ½” = 1’. Clean, rolled, but moderate wear and lengthy tears to original folds. (G). $80.

28290. (blueprint) United States Lighthouse Service. Radio Beacon House and Boat Davits, Lightship #90. Office of the Superintendent of lighthouses 1 st District Portland, Maine August 21, 1934 (sheet 3 of 3 only). 21” x 32”. Original blueprint includes large view of after deck of Lightship No. 90 including radio beacon house, as well as five details of the beacon house walls, boat davits and fittings. Scale 3/8” = 1’. Clean, rolled, only light wear to original folds. (VG+). $110.

28288. (blueprint) United States Lighthouse Service. Electrically Operated Flasher, Office of the Superintendent of Lighthouses 3rd District Tompkinsville NY (1 of 1) December 5, 1913. (corrected July 22, 1919.) 22” x 30”. Back stamped Office of the Superintendent of Lighthouses 1st. District, Portland, Maine. 1931. Includes many views, details and bill of materials for an electrically operated flasher. Scale full size. Clean, rolled, some fading to bottom, only light wear, a few small tears. (VG-). $67

28329a,b,c. (blueprint) United States Lighthouse Service. Lantern Winch Ratchet for Light Vessel No. 90. Office of the Superintendent of Lighthouses (1 of 1) June 10, 1912. 9 ½” x 13”. Original blueprint includes two views of cast iron ratchet wheel for lantern winch. Scale not noted. Clean, rolled, some edge wear. (VG-). $24.

28289. (set 5 blueprints) United States Lighthouse Service. Occulting Clock for Electric Flasher, Office of the Superintendent of Lighthouses 3rd District Tompkinsville NY (sheets 1-5 of 5) June 30, 1915. (revised January 30, 1918.)  22” x 30”. Back stamped Office of the Superintendent of Lighthouses 1st. District, Portland, Maine. 1931. Includes a great many views, details and bill of materials for this occulting clock for the electric flasher, presumably for the lightship optic. Scale full size. Clean, rolled, some fading to bottom, only light wear, a few small tears. Complete 5 sheets. (VG-). $245.

28286. (blueprint) United States Lighthouse Service. Fuel Oil Tanks Lightship #90. Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corp Ltd. November 22, 1934. Approved by Office of the Superintendent of Lighthouses 1st. District. 29” x 42”. Back stamped Department of Commerce, Lighthouse Service, Superintendent of Lighthouses, 1st. District, Portland, Maine. November 28, 1934. Includes a number of large sectional views through the lightship hull showing the fuel tanks, their construction, welds and more. Scale 1” = 1’. Overall clean, rolled, some wear from use, a bit of fading here and there. Wear to edges. (VG-). $110.

26191. (architectural reproduction prints) U. S. Lightship No. 83 c.1903. Views c.1903 from original drawings, U. S. Light-House Board. 36. Lightship No. 83 was one of five ships built by New York Shipbuilding Co. in Camden, NJ - along with No. 78, 79, 80, and 81. The ship was 135 feet long, with whale oil lamps and a steam engine fired by coal. The ship was fitted with a fog signal (a steam whistle) and two mushroom anchors. No. 83 was completed in 1904 and assigned to California. The ship sailed around South America along with No. 76, arriving in San Francisco on 1905. No. 83 was assigned to Blunts Reef, three miles north of Cape Mendocino. Measured and drafted for the Historic American Engineering Record, these reproduction prints measure 11" X 17"., scale 3/16” = 1’. The six prints include: Print one displays a side view profile of the ship. Print two displays a side view and plan view highlighting details of the deck house. Print three displays various cross section views of the ship looking forward and aft. Print four displays side and end views of the ship hull lines. Print five displays side, plan, and end views of the mechanical systems found on the ship. Print six displays details on the lens, (lights) found on the masts of the ship and details of how the ship should be moored in both good and heavy weather. Great for research or display. Set 6 prints $48.  

23446a, b, c. (lot 3 mounted photos). U.S. Lightship No 94 Frying Pan Shoals c.1911. Wonderful set of three rare mounted photos show Lightship No. 94 as she travels via canals to her first station on the East Coast. In 1911, a 135'9" lightship, No. 94 was built in Muskegon, Michigan, by the Racine-Truscott-Shell Lake Boat Co. That same year the vessel sailed from Lake Michigan to Montreal...and then presumably to her first station at Frying Pan Shoal, North Carolina where she served from 1911 to 1930. When she was constructed she was considered by the Lighthouse Service to be the “most highly developed” lightship in the fleet. Photos are clear and crisp and measure 2 ½” x 4 ¼” on 4” x 6” mounts. Views include a fine bow view of the Lightship coming through one of the canals, a close-up of the forward portion of the vessel and a close-up of the open bridge with officer and others on board. Fine clear, close views. (VG+). $188.

28281. [glass negative] Brenton Reef Lightship, Newport, Rhode Island. c.1900. Unusual b/w glass negative featuring sailing yachts near the Brenton Reef lightship, Newport, Rhode Island. The negative is large 4” x 5” and would provide a large clear print. Included is a contact print made from the negative showing the view. A superb, clear image. Contact print has some tape residue but glass negative is fine, perfect for reproduction. (VG+). $54 net.

28272. (photo) Royal Sovereign Lightship. January 10, 1927. National News Photo. 6” x 8” b/w. From the credit line on obverse: “The new Royal Sovereign Lightship, 7 miles off Eastbourne, equipped with a powerful electric light, submarine oscillator, wireless, and a larger crew than the old type of lightship that was taken off duty.” Nice clear, close view of the vessel and desk equipment. Close, rare view, some wear, fading. (VG). $48.

  

28119. (architectural drawing) Cat Head. U.S. Light Vessels Nos. 51, 52, 53 and 54. December 8, 1891. F. W. Wheeler & Company ship-builders of West Bay City, Michigan. Original architectural drawing on linen measures 23 ½” x 36” and is hand drawn in two colors. Two views, one from top and one from side, show Cat Head as mounted on the deck of the lightship. The cat head is a beam projecting from each side of the bows of a ship, almost horizontally. It is designed for the purpose of raising the anchor from the surface of the water to the deck without touching the bows, and for carrying the anchor on its stock end when suspended outside the ship's side. It is furnished with sheaves at the outer end, and the inner end (which is called the cat’s tail) fits down on the cat-beam. This original architectural drawing represents a great view into the design and construction of a portion of this style of lightship. The drawing is quite beautiful and would be wonderful for research or to frame for display. Extremely scarce. Very good condition, clean crisp, no tears. (VG+). $185. 

28119b. (architectural drawing) Awning Stanchion, Full Size Sketch. U.S. Light Vessels Nos. 51, 52, 53 and 54. October 20, 1891. F. W. Wheeler & Company ship-builders of West Bay City, Michigan. Original architectural drawing on linen measures 11 ¾” x 28 ¾”  and is hand drawn in two colors. Four views, one from top and one from side as well as views of brackets, show stanchion that was mounted on the railing to support the canvas awning on the stern and midships of the vessel. This original architectural drawing represents a great view into the design and construction of a portion of this style of lightship. The drawing is quite beautiful and would be wonderful for research or to frame for display. Extremely scarce. Very good condition, bright, clean crisp, no tears. (VG+). $135

2882. (magic lantern glass slide) U. S. Lightship underway. c.1890-1910. Beautiful b/w  glass projection slide features a U. S. lightship underway on a New England river. The vessel looks freshly painted and may be new. Slide manufactured in Boston.  Slide measures 3 ¼” x 4” and presents a fine, clear image. (F).  $24.

2821. (DVD) The Lightship (1985, released June 2005) with actors: Tom Bower, Klaus Maria Brandauer, Robert Costanzo, Badja Djola, Robert Duvall. From the 1934 novel by Archie Binns. Lightships – stationary vessels that serve as offshore lighthouses – were once a common feature of the America n coasts. In “The Lightship”, director Jerzy Sk olimowski takes us into the storm-tossed, suffocatingly close world of a lightship to witness the age-old struggle of good and evil in a uniquely nightmarish setting. The ship’s captain, Klaus Marie Brandauer, must somehow protect his men and his rebellious son against an invading gang led by a man who is as cunning as he is without scruples (Robert Duvall). The trio of robbers, two brothers and their twisted genius leader, don't reckon on the crew fighting back. Filmed on an actual lightship meticulously restored to evoke a now bygone way of life, “The Lightship” is a powerful and realistically vivid drama of one man’s struggle against the powers of darkness. Color, DVD-Video, Widescreen, NTSC. Running time 88 minutes. New and factory sealed! Never viewed! (M). $21.95.

 

25365. Harbour Lights Yorktown Lightship Lens Replica. The newest lens from Harbour Lights is a "must-have" for collectors! This unique design, with roof and doors that really open, is representative of a lightship lens innovation. The original lens can be viewed at the Coast Guard Training Facility at Yorktown , Virginia . Limited to 4,000 pieces, this lighted acrylic replica comes with a wood-like display base and plug-in AC adapter. Also uses 2 "AA" batteries (not included) to light up. Striking when lit. 7" x 5".  Style HL675. New in original box and packing. (M). $79.95.Out of stock.

27390. (mounted photo) Vineyard Sound Light Vessel No. 41 c.1900. Lightship No. 41 was built at Portland , Maine by : S. Gildersleeve & Sons for a cost of $33,000. She was constructed of white oak & locust; copper & galvanized iron fastened; with a bowsprit; 2 masts with daymarks; stack forward of mainmast; 2 aux. steam boilers. She served on the Vineyard Sound station from 1876-1910, and 1915-1924. Photo measures 3 ¼” square on white 5” square mount. Image is clear and crisp, just a bit distant. Mount has had one fold but it is not visible in the image. Overall only light soiling and wear. (VG-). $78.

6366v. Putnam, George R. LIGHTHOUSES AND LIGHTSHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES. Cambridge, MA. 1933 2nd ed. 324pp. DJ. Contains 48 photos and maps. Historical and descriptive work by the Commissioner of lighthouses. Good information from a most reliable source, nice overall view. Includes chapters on the history and organization, Boston Light and the Colonial Lights, US lighthouses around the country, lighthouse construction and apparatus, lightships and lighthouse tenders, buoys and daymarks, fog signals, the light-keepers, and much more. This most important work has become quite scarce. Unusually good copy, overall clean, light age toning, edge wear to dj. (VG-).  $124.

23312. Cipra, David L., LIGHTHOUSES & LIGHTSHIPS OF THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO . Eighth Coast Guard District. GPO.  1976. 62p. Soft wraps. Extremely early version which later led to his 1997 text Lighthouses, Lightships, And The Gulf Of Mexico . Still one of the few books that covers this little known region on the Gulf Coast , from Florida ’s West Coast to the lower Texas coast. The comprehensive text not only brings to life the lighthouses, lightships and the men and women who tended them, but it also examines the political and financial events leading up to their establishment. Well documented and most interesting reading. Well illustrated with over 90 early photographs, plans and illustrations. First time I have found this rare Coast Guard publication. (VG).  $28 / Your price $ 16.80.

2035. na. CREWLESS LIGHTSHIP IS NEW ‘FLYING DUTCHMAN’. Popular Mechanics Magazine. December 1932. One page article with large illustration described new unmanned lightship designed to operate on carbonic acid gas and acetylene gas for six months without maintenance. In later years this would evolve into the large unmanned light buoys and towers that we know today. Additional articles include how the Lighthouse Service maintains its 10,100 buoys at sea, with two photographs, the radio-doctor saving life in the Arctic, and many more interesting articles of the day. Full issue, only light wear. (VG). $19 / Your price $ 11.40.

23387a. PLAN & DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS FOR BUILDING A TRUE SCALE MODEL ILLUMINATING [BRITISH] LIGHTSHIP by Eric Richardson. British. Large 10” x 15” sheet includes blueprint of the vessel and parts, with printed instructions on the obverse. Good detail but a bit crude, a great collectible or start for the modeler who desires a challenge. One sheet, folded. (VG-).  $32 / Your price $ 19.20.

 

28105. (photo lot) Abandoned Lightship ?. Superb lot of six b/w photographs shows great detail of an abandoned British light vessel moored high and dry on the beach. Vessel has a hull entirely of wood, with the tall central mast and large lantern still intact. Photos provide great detail of the lantern and apparatus, hull, deck, rudder and more. Vessel may be abandoned, or may be undergoing repairs, its fate is not clear. Would guess images to be c.1930-1950.Nice lot. (VG+).   $144.

2615. (painting) William (Bill) Paxton. PORTLAND LIGHTSHIP. This is an authentic, signed original water color on artist’s board by Portland Maine 's own artist, Bill Paxton. This bright rendition measures 8 inches by 10 inches and is signed in the bottom right hand corner by the artist. Titled on the back Lightship Portland circa 1960, Portland , Maine . William "Bill" Paxton was born in Lewiston , Maine during the Great Depression. The son of an artist with connections to the Hearst newspaper dynasty, he became interested in historical and current events and developed an appreciation for accuracy and attention to detail. While still in grammar school, he began sketching and drawing cartoons. While in the Air Force, his sketching and painting prowess was recognized by his superiors and upon discharge Bill was hired by the Air Force as a civilian archivist. Upon retirement Bill returned to his beloved Maine and set about to capture the essence of his home state with brush & pallet. As a full time artist he became well known for his work with watercolors and acrylics. Now in his seventies he still paints with vengeance. Today Bill Paxton is one of Maine 's best known and largest selling artists his works have been sold all over the world. Wonderful, bright, perfect for framing. (F). $124 net.

BR-66. na. U. S. LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE. Fortune Magazine January 1937. Pp. 61-69, 126-132. Lengthy, large folio illustrated article details the men and equipment of today’s Lighthouse Service. Wonderfully illustrated with photographs, paintings and diagrams including a large full page diagram of the Nantucket LV No. 112  illustrating its construction, equipment and operation. Other photos include quartermaster at the wheel of the Lighthouse Tender Spruce, lens apparatus, buoys and more. Most interesting and detailed article, excellent images. Disbound, staining to some corners. Worth it for the lightship illustration alone. (VG-).  $34.

DM-28. Cipra, David L., LIGHTHOUSES, LIGHTSHIPS, AND THE GULF OF MEXICO . Alexandria , VA. 1997. 266p. Soft wraps. One of the few books that covers this little known region on the Gulf Coast , from Florida ’s West Coast to the lower Texas coast. The comprehensive text not only brings to life the lighthouses, lightships and the men and women who tended them, but it also examines the political and financial events leading up to their establishment. Well documented and most interesting reading. Wonderfully illustrated with over 80 early photographs, plans and illustrations. (VG+).   $24.95 / Your price $17.

27254. (wooden block) Early U. S. Lighthouse Service wood block (from small block & tackle) is complete with hook and is nicely branded “USLHS” on the wood cheek. Block is used but is beautifully intact, clean and in wonderful condition. Such blocks were used for hoisting in lighthouse construction, and in rigging on lightships and tenders. In excellent condition, it is very rare to find these. Measures 11 ¼” overall length including hook. (VG+).  $685.

 

Reproduction of the Original United States Lighthouse Service Flag.

Treat your family to these replicas of the official sewn U. S. Lighthouse Service flags. Flag is professionally made of high quality flag material, with sewn hem and brass grommets for attaching to halyard. Professionally made and will last for years.

20418. [reproduction] U. S. Lighthouse Service Station Flag. This triangular station flag measures 48” long by 25” and is typical of the flags once flown on Lighthouse Service vessels and at the light stations for over one hundred years. The flag is of the standard design, with red border on a field of white, with a large blue lighthouse silhouette.  $79.95.

9421. Gowdy, Jim & Kim Ruth. GUIDING LIGHTS OF THE DELAWARE RIVER AND BAY. Sweetwater, NJ., 1999. 296p. Soft wraps. Signed by the authors. Just released, this is the most comprehensive history ever written on the lighthouses, lightships, tenders and depots of the Delaware River and Bay – from Cape May to Gloucester City and Philadelphia to Fenwick Island . This detailed history was painstakingly research by the authors and is enhanced by more than 180 photographs and 25 illustrations. Using records from the National Archives, Coast Guard, and private collections this monumental work provides wonderful reading. The vintage photographs alone are a feast to the eye and offer previously unseen views of many of these interesting stations. Includes are views of a number these lights under construction, and some in the process of destruction. Also includes rare views of tenders, keepers, light vessels and much more. Only light wear (VG+).   $68.

25371. A LIGHTSHIP ADRIFT by Walter Wood. The Illustrated London News. November 7, 1903. Full issue. Lengthy two page fictional tale of British seamen who plot to set a North Sea lightship adrift in order to win the salvage rights and pay for towing her into port. Clean, full issue with many period articles on various subjects. (VG).  $42.

28162. Floca, Brian. LIGHTSHIP. New York . 2007. 40p. DJ. This is a truly beautiful picture book about a subject most young readers may never have encountered. Author-illustrator Floca, in brisk but poetic words and stunning watercolors that are both witty and informative, tells the story of the red-hulled Ambrose Light. Young adventurers are sure to be drawn into the life of the crew and its cat, as the ship weathers fog, storms, and close encounters with other vessels, while all the time she "holds her one sure spot." From the shining lights high on the masts to the domain of the engineer deep in the hull, Floca's research lets readers explore the equipment of a lightship and the perils of the sea. Though each picture deserves attention, especially striking are the ones of the scarlet hull in a snowstorm (through portholes, cat and cook are seen snug below) and of the huge black shape of the S.S. Ardizzone (a tribute to the English illustrator) looming over the Ambrose as a crewman shouts his warning. (M). $19.95.

 

2312. MacAlindin, Bob. NO PORT IN A STORM. Scotland . 2000. 146 p. Soft wraps. Now in its second printing. The ships of this book evoke none of the usual romantic images of ships and yet may be the noblest of all. Invariably painted a gaudy red, no other ships spent more time at sea yet sailed fewer miles, their crews compelled to scan the same water and stretch of coastline for the bulk of their working lives. The life of a lightshipman in a hurricane was a sleepless nightmare of holding on, body braced against every combination of rolling and pitching, with tons of water burying the ship. This enthralling book describes 18 factual adventures from many countries including America, Denmark, Ireland, Canada, England, Holland, Scotland, Australia and Belgium giving vivid accounts of life aboard and the many hazards and disasters that occurred. (M).  $34.95.

21154. [ Columbia Lightship video] Columbia River Lightship – An Exploration Northwest Adventure. 1976. . Don McCune Library. This video beautifully illustrates life aboard the Columbia River Lightship in the 1970’s, and Columbia River Bar history. Shot on 16mm color film in 1976. 30 minutes, VHS format. Interviews on board include CWO Elmer A. Stevens, Captain, who noted "You always have the fear of a ship running you down. In foul weather, the visibility drops. There's 90 mile-an-hour winds out there ... a ship bearing down on you. If your radar is out, you're in a terrible fix. [Launching a buoy] is the most dangerous work there is, bar none, in the service. We've had guys get caught between the buoys and the gunwales and get injured. That chain's whipped and broke their legs. There's been several lightships sunk in the fog; the [lightship] Nantucket was sunk and they never found anything. During a storm when the wind picks up over fifty knots, we start our engines up and keep them on one-third ahead to take the strain off the [anchor] chain and we have run forty hours like that."  Video also includes footage of Relief, which replaced the Columbia during schedule maintainance. Interesting one-of-a-kind footage about life on board a lightship. (M).  $15.95.

 

 

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Page updated April 03, 2014

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